Letters to the Editor

Shedding light on a celebration

A deeper meaning behind modern Christmas decorations should be celebrated, write Pummy Kaur and Ruth Kile.  - Comstock photo
A deeper meaning behind modern Christmas decorations should be celebrated, write Pummy Kaur and Ruth Kile.
— image credit: Comstock photo

Editor:

In February, forests are felled to make romantic valentines for underage classmates.

In March/April, veneration of the male, egg-laying bunny.

In May, another forest is sacrificed for the only day we are prepared to recognize the work done by mothers.

Then the summer pilgrimage to a talking mouse.

In October, reverence of turkeys, pumpkins, candies and the spooky world.

November, in making poppies, not peace.

In December, teaching songs/stories of praise/worship of a little red dwarf breaking/entering and vandalizing.

Surely, we can do something more meaningful with the lives and minds of our children?

During my 40-year education career, not one student has known the origins of the multitude of global celebrations of “light” in December.

The word “solstice” comes as a surprise to most teachers. However, no one ever has trouble discussing the stuff they wanted, were tired of shopping for, were hoping not to get…

I am exhausted by being asked about shopping, hearing complains of stress due to shopping and family demands, and then being told how this a season of peace and love!

If this is truly a season of peace and love, then stop encouraging children to worship The Little Red Dwarf and his Merry Consumption message.

Teach them that this a time to celebrate return of “light,” so that food plants may regrow, and our spirit may enlarge to encompass all beings.

Make Jesus proud! Show Him that He did not die in vain to be replaced by idol worship of “stuff.”

Pummy Kaur, Surrey

• • •

Let’s keep the true meaning of Christmas.

Christmas is the celebration of Jesus Christ’s birthday.

The symbol of the evergreen tree represents His gift of everlasting life.

The coloured lights adorning the tree tell a story, too.

The yellow lights remind us that He is “the light of the world.” Blue lights represent truth, for He is the truth and the life.

Purple is royalty, for He was born a king. Red: He gave His life and shed His blood that we might be saved. White represents purity, for He was without sin.

We usually place a star on the top of the tree. The star reminds us of the star over Bethlehem. A chorus of angels bathed in its light singing “Glory to God in the Highest.” The same star guided the three wise men and the shepherds to the stable in Bethlehem where Jesus was born, as there was no room for them at the inn.

Christmas is God’s gift of love to us, for “God so loved the world (you and me) that He gave His only begotten Son, so that whoever believes in Him will not perish, but have the gift of  everlasting life.”

Oh what a gift!

So let’s celebrate Christmas.

Ruth Kile, White Rock

 



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