With the recent and not entirely unsurprising retirements of the Continental and MKZ sedans for 2021, the 2021 Corsair assumes the entry-point position for the brand.

With the recent and not entirely unsurprising retirements of the Continental and MKZ sedans for 2021, the 2021 Corsair assumes the entry-point position for the brand.

2021 Lincoln Corsair: Lincoln’s new entry-level vehicle is also a great sedan alternative

The Corsair, which was new for 2020, replaced the MKC

Among Lincoln’s quartet of luxury-level tall wagons, the 2021 Corsair is the most compact, but it more than holds its own at the crossroads of style and technology.

For those unaware, the Corsair, which was new for 2020, replaced the MKC. With the recent and not entirely unsurprising retirements of the Continental and MKZ sedans for 2021, the Corsair assumes the entry-point position for the brand.

The design of this five-passenger utility vehicle has similar cues to the larger seven-passenger Aviator that was also new for 2020. The grilles are nearly identical in size and shape and the rest of the Corsair’s body panels are also similar but scaled down.

Compared with the departed MKC, the Corsair is about 3.5 centimetres longer, 7.5 centimetres wider and has about 2.5 centimetres more distance between the front and rear wheels. This contributes to a bit more stowage capacity behind the back seat as well as when it’s folded flat. It can be moved fore and aft up to 15 centimetres, depending on whether cargo or passenger space is the priority.

The Corsair is now Lincoln’s entry vehicle, and what an elegant welcome mat to the brand it is. Being longer and wider than the MKC, the Corsair appears lower and sleeker. PHOTO: LINCOLN

The Corsair is now Lincoln’s entry vehicle, and what an elegant welcome mat to the brand it is. Being longer and wider than the MKC, the Corsair appears lower and sleeker. PHOTO: LINCOLN

Compared with the MKC’s busy flight-deck dashboard layout, the Corsair’s is distinguished by a ribbon of air vents, an eight-inch or optional 12.3-inch tablet-style touch-screen propped up beside the gauges, and a control panel that protrudes just above the floor console. The transmission buttons extend horizontally below the vents and are within easy reach.

An unusual step, and one intended to make the Corsair classier, the alerts (unbuckled seatbelt, door ajar, etc.) are actually musical sound clips created by the Detroit Symphony Orchestra. Definitely better than the usual grating warning chimes.

The base Corsair Standard is equipped with a turbocharged 2.0-litre four-cylinder that puts out 250 horsepower and 280 pound-feet of torque. The optional Reserve trim level is fitted with a turbocharged 2.3-litre I-4 with a rating of 295 horsepower and 310 pound-feet.

New for 2021, the Corsair can be had with a plug-in hybrid powertrain, which is standard in the equally new Grand Touring model. Using a 2.5-litre four-cylinder and an electric motor, the system makes 266 horsepower. It provides the Corsair with up to 40 kilometres of electric-only range.

The turbo engines are connected to eight-speed automatic transmissions. The hybrid gets a continuously variable unit.

Official fuel-consumption numbers for the base 2.0 are 11.1 l/100 km in the city, 8.1 on the highway and 9.8 combined. The plug-in hybrid values are 6.9/7.3/7.1.

All-wheel-drive is standard with both the 2.0 and the 2.3 engines plus the hybrid. The on-demand system turns only the front tires under optimum traction conditions, but when they slip — such as on wet or icy surfaces — the AWD directs torque to the rear tires. There are five operating modes: Normal; Excite (sporty); Slippery; Deep Conditions (mud and sand); and Conserve (economy).

Compared with the MKC, the Corsair’s dashboard is less cluttered and there’s more shoulder room because of a more than 7.5-centimetre increase in width.

Compared with the MKC, the Corsair’s dashboard is less cluttered and there’s more shoulder room because of a more than 7.5-centimetre increase in width.

The Corsair Standard trim starts at $45,950 in Canada, including destination fees. It comes with 10-way power-operated and heated front seats, power liftgate, active interior noise control and a 10-speaker premium audio system.

Along with the larger-displacement turbo engine, the Reserve comes with voice-activated navigation, leather seat covers, panoramic sunroof and 19-inch wheels (18s are standard).

The Grand Touring hybrid boasts special trim plus an adaptive (continuously variable) suspension that adjusts the ride control according to road conditions and how the Corsair is being driven.

All Corsairs are fitted with numerous active safety technologies such as emergency braking, pedestrian detection and lane-keeping assist.

With innumerable competitors, the Corsair merits consideration for its tack-sharp looks and roomy, harmonious cabin. Together they could persuade buyers seeking a reasonably sized and priced utility vehicle as well as those who were in the market for one of Lincoln’s retired sedans.

The Corsair is not a large vehicle, so the rear seat moves fore and aft up to 15 centimetres to suit the moment, whether cargo or rear-seat legroom is the priority. PHOTO: LINCOLN

The Corsair is not a large vehicle, so the rear seat moves fore and aft up to 15 centimetres to suit the moment, whether cargo or rear-seat legroom is the priority. PHOTO: LINCOLN

WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW: 2021 LINCOLN CORSAIR

Type: All-wheel-drive compact utility vehicle

Engines (h.p.): 2.0-litre I-4, turbocharged (250); 2.3-litre I-4, turbocharged (295); 2.5-litre I-4 with electric motor (266)

Transmissions: Eight-speed automatic; continuously variable (hybrid)

Market position: The only Lincolns available are utility vehicles, and the Corsair is the smallest. It has a lot riding on its shoulder, but styling improvements over the MKC — and the wide range of options — will help the Corsair compete bring in new customers.

Points: Styling resembles that of other Lincoln models, especially the bigger Aviator. • Engine choices produce reasonable power and fuel economy.

  • Plug-in hybrid is a welcome addition, but only with for one trim?
  • Standard active-safety tech covers nearly all contingencies.
  • Symphonic chimes instead of bells and buzzers are a nice touch.

Active safety: Blind-spot warning with cross-traffic backup alert (std.); active cruise control (std.); front and rear emergency braking (std.); inattentive-driver alert (std.); lane-departure warning (std.); pedestrian detection (std.)

L/100 km (city/hwy): 11.1/8.1 (2.0)

Base price (incl. destination): $45,950

BY COMPARISON

Acura RDX

  • Base price: $46,200
  • Third-generation model comes with a 272-h.p turbo I-4. AWD is standard.

Audi Q3

  • Base price: $41,550
  • Recently redesigned utility vehicle uses a 228-h.p. turbo I-4. AWD standard.

Cadillac XT4 AWDs

  • Base price: $46,700
  • Attractive Caddy is on par with the competition. A 237-h.p. turbo I-4 is standard.

– written by Malcom Gunn, Managing Partner at Wheelbase Media

If you’re interested in new or used vehicles, be sure to visit TodaysDrive.com to find your dream car today! Like us on Facebook and follow us on Instagram

AutomotivecarsSUVsTrucks

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Volunteers from Semiahmoo Secondary joined with members of the Lower Mainland Green Team and the White Rock and South Surrey Naturalists Wednesday to remove invasive plants from White Rock’s Ruth Johnson Park in March. (Contributed photo)
Green Team, South Surrey students mark Earth Day with invasive plant removal

Volunteers to be on site at White Rock’s Ruth Johnson Park

rcmp
South Surrey neighbours’ calls to police lead to break-and-enter arrest

‘Prime example’ of RCMP and public working together, constable says

Members of the Wheeling 8’s dance group go on a roll at Surrey’s Chuck Bailey Recreation Centre in 2018, during the club’s 45th-anniversary event. If not for the pandemic, such activities could be socially prescribed as part of a new program involving Fraser Health and DiverseCity Community Resources Society. (File photo: Tom Zillich)
‘Social prescriptions’ connect Surrey seniors to activities and other services they need

Fraser Health-backed program involves GP referrals to a Seniors’ Community Connector with DiverseCity

Linda Annis, Aug. 12, 2020. (Photo: Malin Jordan)
Annis wants independent auditor general for Surrey

‘Surrey taxpayers deserve the best possible oversight of the tax dollars they send to city hall,’ Surrey councillor says

SkyTrain’s end of the line, for now, in Whalley. (File photo)
Provincial budget watchers lament no mention of Surrey SkyTrain expansion

But $1.66 billion is earmarked for a second hospital for Surrey, in Cloverdale

A large crowd protested against COVID-19 measures at Sunset Beach in Vancouver on Tuesday, April 20, 2021. (Snapchat)
VIDEO: Large, police-patrolled crowds gather at Vancouver beach for COVID protests

Vancouver police said they patrolled the area and monitored all gatherings

Thousands have converged in Whonnock Lake Park to enjoy the nice weather. (Roxanne Hooper/The News)
Thousands enjoy B.C. park with warnings about social distancing

Portable toilets installed in anticipation of nice weather

FILE – The Instagram app is shown on an iPhone in Toronto on Monday, March 19, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graeme Roy
Judge acquits B.C. teen boy ‘set up’ on sex assault charge based on Instagram messages

The girl and her friends did not have ‘good intentions’ towards the accused, judge says

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

Kai Palkeinen recently helped a car stuck on the riverbed near the Big Eddy Bridge. While the car could not be saved, some of the driver’s belongings were. It’s common for vehicles to get stuck in the area due to significantly changing river levels from Revelstoke Dam. (Photo by Kai Palkeinen)
“I just sank a car’: Revelstoke resident tries to save vehicle from the Columbia River

Although it’s not permitted, the riverbed near the city is popular for off roading

Playland at the PNE is set to reopen this May, with COVID-19 health and safety measures approved by the province. (Website/Playland)
VIDEO: Playland at PNE scheduled to reopen this May to masked customers

British Columbians are discouraged from travelling outside of their local health authority to visit the theme park

Meng Wanzhou, chief financial officer of Huawei, walks down the street with an acquaintance after leaving B.C. Supreme Court during a lunch break at her extradition hearing, in Vancouver, B.C., Thursday, April 1, 2021. A judge is scheduled to release her decision today on a request to delay the final leg of hearings in Meng Wanzhou’s extradition case. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Rich Lam
B.C. judge grants Meng Wanzhou’s request to delay extradition hearings

Lawyers for Canada’s attorney general had argued there is no justification to delay proceedings in the case

B.C. Premier John Horgan announces travel restrictions between the province’s regional health authorities at the legislature, April 19, 2021. (B.C. government photo)
B.C. sees 862 more COVID-19 cases Wednesday, seven deaths

Recreational travel restrictions set to begin Friday

B.C. Finance Minister Selina Robinson is photographed following her budget speech in the legislative assembly at the provincial legislature in Victoria, Tuesday, April 20, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
B.C. budget lacks innovative drive, vision during uncertain times, say experts

Finance Minister Selina Robinson’s budget sets out to spend $8.7 billion over three years on infrastructure

Most Read