A Triumph traffic control truck. (Triumph)

CAREER FAIR: Langley company keeps traffic moving

The next Black Press Extreme Education and Career Fair is on March 14 in Maple Ridge

From starting small a little more than a decade ago, Triumph Traffic Langley has grown into a multi-million-dollar company with 50 employees – and it is looking to add more.

By industry standards, that still makes it one of the smaller companies offering traffic control services in the Lower Mainland.

And that’s a good thing, according to Carmen Brunning, a Triumph Traffic manager and dispatcher with 12 years’ experience in guiding drivers past construction projects and other road blockages.

The company has never lost the close ties with employees and clients that are only possible in a smaller operation, she said. “That’s the biggest thing. We’re more personable. Everyone is not a number.”

READ MORE: Looking for a new job or training program? This career fair is for you

That tends to engender loyalty, she added, with some employees who have been with Triumph practically since it set up shop.

Located in Gloucester Industrial Estates in Aldergrove, Triumph provides traffic control services and training to construction and engineering firms throughout the Lower Mainland.

It provides lane closure trucks with flashing arrow boards, and traffic control people – also known as flaggers.

Among other things, it has in stock barrels, barricades, and portable arrow boards, and a fleet of pilot cars to assist movers with oversized loads.

It can even make custom traffic signs, including truck decals and vehicle wraps for advertising. The company has also worked on film shoots, bicycle races, marathons, fireworks, and concerts.

Brunning is a former flagger who now works indoors managing outdoor crews. But she sounds slightly nostalgic when she is asked about the appeal of the work.

It’s the freedom, she said. When a lineup of vehicles is getting longer and longer, a flagger needs to make decisions on the spot, without waiting for direction from head office.

“The best part for me, working on the road, was the independence,” Brunning said. “You’re kind of your own boss.”

The company is looking to hire “all kinds of personalities,” but certain traits are good to have, Brunning said. “Patience would be great.”

Another asset: good people skills when dealing with drivers who may not be in the best mood about traffic delays.

Triumph is just one of more than 60 businesses – such as EV Logistics in Langley, Discovery Community College, Commissionaires, Natural Factors, Mark Anthony Academy of Cosmetology, Thompson Community Services, Vancouver Career College, and WorkBC Maple Ridge – taking part in the upcoming Black Press Extreme Education and Career Fair.

The event, which runs from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Thursday, March 14, is being held at the Greg Moore Youth Centre in Maple Ridge. For more information, visit the Facebook page.

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