Unifor spokesman Paul Johal addressing container port truckers during last spring's 28-day strike.

Province legislates rates for container truckers

Move aims to stabilize turbulent trucking industry, avoid new strike and ensure Port Metro Vancouver reliability

The province has introduced legislation aimed at stabilizing the turbulent container trucking business and avoid a repeat of last spring’s strike that disrupted goods shipping through Port Metro Vancouver.

The legislation extends minimum rates to more of the container truck fleet, plugging holes left by a previous failed federal attempt at rate regulation.

The provincial move dovetails with the port’s announcement a week ago that it will bring in a new licence system and reduce the number of trucks licensed to serve port terminals.

Container truck drivers have long complained of low pay as a result of the sector’s fiercely competitive players constantly undercutting each other.

Part of the problem is the 2,000 trucks licensed to haul from container terminals amount to too many drivers chasing too little work.

The new system is expected to make it harder and costlier to be in port trucking, spurring some of the less responsible firms to move on to other lines of work.

Past efforts to regulate rates only applied to about 20 per cent of the region’s container trucks and they didn’t apply at all to so-called “off-dock” rates for moving containers between various warehouses.

As a results, some drivers were paid the regulated $100 a trip to pick up from a port terminal, but only $15 for off-dock hauling of containers between other sites.

The provincial law will require trucking firms that serve the port terminals to also pay regulated rates to drivers for the off-dock trips.

A new container trucking commissioner will regulate truck licensing and enforce rates, as well as wait time compensation and fuel surcharges.

“We are confident this legislation will establish fair working conditions in this sector as well as allow Port Metro Vancouver to increase its efficiency and reliability as a world-class port,” Transportation Minister Todd Stone said.

Unionized truckers had warned over the summer another strike was possible if the province failed to take action.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Surrey Police Board approves creation of municipal force at first-ever meeting

Process for hiring a police chief to ‘start immediately’: McCallum

B.C. announces regional cancer treatment centre to be included in new Surrey hospital

Services expected to include treatment, supportive care, research, education, innovative technologies

Delta Nature Reserve boardwalk realignment to begin this fall

Stretch of boardwalk to be rebuilt to make room for new Highway 91/Nordel Way vehicle ramp

Cloverdale store owner giving away free face shields

Tricia Ellingsen offering more than 200 free protective shields

Two new recycling trucks on the way for White Rock

Council approves higher cost to reduce operations yard problems

371 British Columbians battling COVID-19, health officials confirm

Thursday (Aug. 6) saw a second straight day of nearly 50 new confirmed cases

Four activists face charges linked to 2019 Abbotsford hog-farm protest

Mischief and break-and-enter charges laid for incidents on four separate days prior to the protest

Visitors and non-residents entering closed remote B.C. First Nation’s territories

With limited resources, they say they don’t have any authority or power to enforce the closures

UBC loses appeal on Fisheries Act convictions

BC Supreme Court upholds order to pay $1.55-million fine

‘Tiny home’ being built for Abbotsford woman with severe allergies

Online campaign raises $59,000 for custom cargo trailer for Katie Hobson

Masks to be mandatory on BC Transit, TransLink starting Aug. 24

Both BC Transit and TransLink made the announcement in separate press releases on Thursday

Acclaimed B.C. actor Brent Carver passes away

Carver, one of Canada’s greatest actors with a career spanning 40 years, passed away at home in Cranbrook

B.C. would not send students back to school if there was ‘overwhelming risk’: Horgan

Plan has left many parents across the province worried about their children’s safety

Most Read

l -->