Woodfibre LNG aims to meet Squamish conditions

Aboriginal group sets its requirements for approval of $1.6-billion liquefied natural gas plant, pipeline

Overhead rendering of proposed Woodfibre LNG terminal site.

Woodfibre LNG has hit the pause button on the environmental review of its proposed $1.6-billion liquefied natural gas plant near Squamish.

The 180-day review had been slated to end July 13 but the temporary suspension granted June 30 gives the proponents more time to consult the Squamish Nation.

The aboriginal group, which has been conducting its own environmental assessment, had just issued five conditions it said must all be met for it to consider approving the project.

Topping the list of first nation concerns is Woodfibre’s plan to use a seawater cooling system that could suck in and kill small fish, and would discharge warmer chlorinated water to Howe Sound. The Squamish want more information on the potential use of alternative systems.

RELATED:LNG plant spawns fear for Howe Sound herring

They also want guaranteed access to their lands, protection of a wildlife management area and insurance or a bond to compensate against any mishap – all enforced through a legally binding environmental certificate.

Squamish Nation leaders will vote to accept or reject the Woodfibre LNG proposal at the end of July.

Woodfibre vice-president Byng Giraud pledged to work with the Squamish while the provincially led environmental assessment is on hold.

“Our focus now is to take the time to review them and work with Squamish Nation to understand their conditions,” he said, adding the conditions, as expected, reflect the Squamish commitment to protect land, water and heritage.

The plant would be on the site of an old pulp mill that Woodfibre has already begun remediating.

The project is not as massive as LNG proposals on B.C.’s north coast, but it is thought to have a better chance of quickly getting approved and built, making it a possible frontrunner in the competitive LNG field.

If it gets the green light, FortisBC would twin an existing pipeline from Coquitlam to deliver natural gas.  Forty tankers a year would load there and carry LNG to Asia.

The company behind the project is indirectly owned by Indonesian billionaire Sukanto Tanoto.

Pipeline corridor route.

 

 

Just Posted

Surrey RCMP looking for missing 17-year-old girl

Police say Rachel Friend was last seen at 4:30 p.m. on Nov. 19, near the 14900-block of 81A Avenue

Three-team trade brings another goalie into Surrey Eagles’ nest

BCHL team ships Chase Stevenson to Trail and acquires blue-liner, goalie

McCallum promises taxes won’t rise in Surrey: ‘That’s set in stone’

Surrey mayor says free parking, a municipal force and other campaign promises won’t mean a tax hike

Surrey council approves free two-hour parking at city hall, around hospital

Although council gave its blessing to offer the free parking Monday (Nov. 19), it was already made free last week

Surrey School District says it needs 7 new schools in next decade

Surrey council endorsed the district’s 2019-20 capital plan on Monday, Nov. 19

White Rock pier light show

Dancing lights highlighted off the water front

Police looking into two more incidents at private Toronto all-boys’ school

Police and the school have said two of the prior incidents involved an alleged sexual assault

5 to start your day

Body found in Maple Ridge ID’ed as Hells Angel, Japanese ‘rising sun’ flag gone from Langley classroom and more

Bovine tuberculosis found in cow on southern B.C. farm

CFIA said the disease was found during slaughter and they are investigating

Air force getting more planes but has no one to fly them, auditor warns

The report follows several years of criticism over the Trudeau government’s decision not to launch an immediate competition to replace the CF-18s.

B.C.’s Esi Edugyan wins $100K Giller prize for Washington Black

Edugyan won her first Scotiabank Giller Prize in 2011 for Half-Blood Blues

Bolder action needed to reduce child poverty: Campaign 2000 report card

The report calls for the federal government to provide more funding to the provinces, territories and Indigenous communities to expand affordable, quality child care.

Judge bars US from enforcing Trump asylum ban

Protesters accused the migrants of being messy, ungrateful and a danger to Tijuana; complained about how the caravan forced its way into Mexico, calling it an “invasion.”

Ottawa Redblacks defensive back Jonathan Rose suspended for Grey Cup

Rose was flagged for unnecessary roughness and ejected for contacting an official with 37 seconds left in the first half following a sideline melee after a Tiger-Cats reception.

Most Read

l -->