The Little Brown Myotis is common and widespread across B.C., but is endangered in Canada, and to expected to decline in B.C. due to white-nose syndrome. (M. Schirmacher/Bat Conservation International photo)

The Little Brown Myotis is common and widespread across B.C., but is endangered in Canada, and to expected to decline in B.C. due to white-nose syndrome. (M. Schirmacher/Bat Conservation International photo)

B.C. bat program uses Halloween to ‘counter bat myths’

Local bat populations ‘need our help’ says regional co-ordinator Danielle Dagenais

With Halloween approaching, the Lower Mainland division of the B.C. Community Bat Program is taking advantage of the spooky season to “counter bat myths” and also do what it can to help the animals across the region and beyond.

International Bat Week is also scheduled from Oct. 24-31, and Community Bat Program organizers are reminding residents about all the good that bats do for the environment, including “eating insects, pollinating flowers and spreading seeds.”

For those interested, program staff encourage people to visit www.batweek.org and www.bcbats.ca.

“Take a moment to learn about the many ways bats contributed to our lives,” a news release states.

Bat Week also coincides with the time of year that bats disappear from our neighbourhoods – and won’t be back until the spring when the weather warms up – which is a good time of year for homeowners to do renovations that some have delayed due to the presence of bats in or near their homes.

As well, “You can clean out and repair a bat box… without disturbing or injuring bats.”

“Bats in B.C. help control agricultural and forest pests, as well as mosquitoes in our yards – but now bats need our help,” said Danielle Dagenais, regional co-ordinator for the B.C. Community Bat Program’s Metro Vancouver-Squamish region.

“The conservation of bats in B.C. has always been important, since over half the species in this province are considered at risk. With the continuing spread of white-nose syndrome in Washington State, bat conservation is more important than ever as we expect to see impacts in B.C. in the near future.”



editorial@peacearchnews.com

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