VIDEO: Surrey girls donate hair, give hope through Wigs for Kids

Emotional event at Coyote Creek Elementary saw 10 girls donate locks to those with cancer

Crystal Scuor, Now-Leader contributor

SURREY — On a beautiful, sunny afternoon in a small school of just 700 students, careless, selfless and genuine acts of kindness took place.

While not all heroes wear capes, one little girl’s hair resembled just that. With her long locks nearly down to her waist and a smile on her face, she took on the role of what most would consider a super hero.

Isabelle Schafer, a Grade 6 student at Coyote Creek Elementary, was one of several children to lose their locks to help kids with cancer.

“These people are being judged because they don’t have hair, so I was like, ‘Why not donate my hair?’” she said during an emotional Wigs for Kids event at the school on March 16.

Isabelle has lost people she loves to cancer and decided to help others who have suffered through chemo, radiation, and endless amounts of medication. Not to mention, the hair loss that comes with chemotherapy.

Those who have already struggled so much because of cancer deserve to keep their confidence, according to Isabelle.

It all began two years ago, when she approached her parents and expressed her desire to help. The family hummed and hawed over different ways to help, until Isabelle finally settled on Wigs for Kids.

Isabelle’s teacher, Courtney Sorge, along with Coyote Creek staff, fully supported the idea.

“For me, I lost a brother to cancer, so it’s near and dear to my heart. And I just love getting so many people involved in the cause,” Sorge told the Now-Leader.

It’s now become an annual event and as more of the school gets involved each year, Isabelle said she feels a great sense of pride knowing she was the one to initiate the fundraiser.

Now in its third year, 10 brave girls took part in the Wigs for Kids annual fundraiser — including Isabelle — and all had their hair cut in front of their entire school.

Each girl chopped off eight to 10 inches, all of which will be sent to B.C. Children’s Hospital to be made into just one wig.

See also: South Surrey girl raises $3,000 for Syrian children with annual hot-chocolate brew

See also: Abbotsford family holds fifth annual Children’s Hospital fundraiser

But hair was not the only donation being made.

Students from every grade raised money for the Children’s Hospital, as well.

Just as the girls all sported their new haircuts, fellow student emcees read aloud the dollar amounts. With the help of bake sales and other fundraising events, Coyote Creek Elementary raised a grand total of $7744.49.

Jeevan raised $1,200 on her own.

“It’s really special to me because I’ve always wanted to do this,” Jeevan said.

During the assembly, an emotional music video was played that showed Maggie McNeil, a girl who has since passed away from cancer. She wrote a song to inspire all those who are suffering that not only are they brave, they are loved.

Following the video, two guest speakers, Christine and Zoey, shared their own stories of courage with the school. Both fought back tears as they thanked the crowd for their contined kindness and donations.

Zoey’s story touched all of the kids in a special way, though — she recently received one of the Wigs for Kids made possible to her thanks to this event. She told the children how much it meant to her.

“Beauty isn’t defined by your appearance. I think true beauty comes from what’s on the inside and it shines out to the world through your confidence,” Zoey told the students. “At the first part of my treatment, I didn’t have any confidence. And this wig, it really did just give me so much back.”

Thanks to Isabelle and everyone at Coyote Creek Elementary, Zoey said finally feels as though her cancer does not define her.

As the assembly came to a close, Isabelle’s parents joined her and Miss. Sorge on stage to give one last thank you to the two ladies who made Wigs for Kids a reality.

In front of all of her peers, Isabelle’s dad held her close and expressed his pride.

“I want to thank my daughter for having a big heart and seeing through me what it’s like to lose family members,” he said. “Thanks for having such a big heart, sweetie.”

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