Using historic footage and interviews with former activists and historians, the documentary The Boys Who Said No! traces the non-violent resistance to the draft that changed the tide of public opinion in the U.S. during the Vietnam War. (Contributed photo)

Using historic footage and interviews with former activists and historians, the documentary The Boys Who Said No! traces the non-violent resistance to the draft that changed the tide of public opinion in the U.S. during the Vietnam War. (Contributed photo)

Vietnam War protest documentary screening in South Surrey

White Rock Social Justice Film Society presents The Boys Who Said No!

A documentary on the young men (and women) who actively opposed the military draft as a means to end the U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War is the next presentation of The White Rock Social Justice Film Society.

The Boys Who Said No!, presented by the society in its ongoing partnership with Semiahmoo Arts Society, will be screened Friday, Jan. 27 at 6:30 p.m. at the Turnbull Gallery at the South Surrey Recreation and Arts Centre.

Directed by Oscar-nominated filmmaker Judith Ehrlich (The Most Dangerous Man in America: Daniel Ellsberg and the Pentagon Papers), and drawing on original interviews with more than 30 male and female nonviolent activists and historians, The Boys Who Said No! has been described as “an overdue and definitive account of the principled and powerful nonviolent resistance to America’s most problematic war.”

The first documentary film to profile the young men and women who actively opposed the draft, it shows how their personal and collective acts of non-violent resistance – which came with a risk of arrest and imprisonment for up to five years, were a critical part of the antiwar movement.

These actions intensified general opposition to the war and ultimately forced an end to both conscription and the war itself, the film argues.

“We offer our films as educational and community-building catalysts for conversation, understanding and, we hope, action,” society member Pat Higinbotham noted.

She added that while the suggested donation of $10 or more for admission – from those who are able – is appreciated, “no one will be denied entry for inability to donate.”

The society also invites patrons to support their work by becoming lifetime members ($20 – in addition to a donation for individual screenings).

The centre is located at 14601 20 Ave., South Surrey; doors open at 6 p.m.



alex.browne@peacearchnews.com

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