Oceana PARC Retirement, coming to White Rock next year, has a variety of community initiatives planned, including a discussion with local real estate expert Marlene Nash and RBC Wealth Management investment advisor Linda Holmes, Oct. 24.

Get the information you need for the retirement you want

Oct. 24 session explores local real estate trends and retirement planning

What does your retirement look like?

Whether you’re planning for a few years down the road, or want to make the most of this time of your life, two local experts will share what you need to know in a retirement planning discussion hosted by Oceana PARC Retirement.

Hosted from 1 to 3 p.m. Oct. 24 at the Oceana PARC presentation centre in the Semihamoo Shopping Centre, the community is invited to hear insights from local real estate expert Marlene Nash and RBC Wealth Management investment advisor Linda Holmes, and learn about the current state of the local real estate industry, in addition to tips for downsizing, residential options and other housing-related issues.

“There’s been a lot of uncertainty in the local real estate market, so some homeowners who have been thinking about taking a new step in their retirement planning have questions. We thought this was a great opportunity to bring in the local experts to share their insights,” explains Shelley Grenier, General Manager, inviting people to RSVP to 778-294-1115.

The Oct. 24 session is just one of a series of community events for the retirement community taking shape in the heart of White Rock.

A Thanksgiving event generated a terrific response, allowing the team to create 26 huge hampers for the Seniors Come Share Society. Looking ahead, plans are in the works for a clothing drive for the Christmas season, and a variety of other community initiatives.

The changing look of retirement

Oceana PARC has aimed to change the way people think what senior living looks like, from the amenities, food, physical and brain fitness programs, to the modern design and décor.

“Not only are most of our future residents from the White Rock and South Surrey area, but we have a much younger audience than what people typically association with a retirement community, with significant interest in people in their 50s, 60s and 70s,” Grenier says.

With the project’s excellent location and diverse activity offerings, residents wanted flexibility. So, starting at $2,500 per month, suites range from studios to three bedrooms plus a den, with a variety of dining options, depending on their needs.

Offerings range from formal dining to “grab-and-go” selections, perfect for those heading to an on-site fitness session, music or art class, or meeting friends for a walk on the pier or the third-floor walking track that will share gorgeous city, ocean and mountain views.

“I think we’re changing people’s perceptions about what senior living can be – it’s like you’re on a cruise ship – you can live the life you want you want to live, but all the necessities are taken care of for you, if that’s what you want,” Grenier says.

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Opening in July 2019, Oceana PARC offers natural beauty in a revitalized seaside community. Visit the presentation centre at the Semiahmoo Shopping Centre where you can tour the show suite and discover the possibilities of an Oceana PARC retirement.

 

Oceana PARC Retirement’s Thanksgiving event generated a terrific response, allowing the team to create 26 huge hampers for the Seniors Come Share Society.

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