What is a collaborative divorce?

The practice of collaborative family law, also known as collaborative divorce, began in British Columbia more than 20 years ago with the recognition that the traditional legal process can be harmful to families facing separation and divorce.

Ending a marriage is never easy; however, a collaborative divorce is ideal for spouses who are looking for a less destructive way to separate than litigation. Going to court to end a relationship, particularly when children are involved, can be expensive, time-consuming and destroy what’s left of the spousal relationship.

The collaborative divorce process provides a structured, supportive and non-adversarial process regardless of how straightforward or complicated the divorce or separation may be. The process is well-suited to address unique cultural and religious values and is appropriate for different types of relationships: marriage, common-law, long- and short-term relationships, and same-sex families. Where there are children involved, the process places them in the centre and not in the middle.

Cohen Buchan Edwards’ specially trained legal team has the training and resources available to create a safe environment for both spouses to negotiate free of judgement or fear, particularly in relationships where mental health, drug, alcohol or family violence has played a role.

The goal of a collaborative divorce is to achieve a no-court separation agreement which is binding and enforceable in court except with respect to children and child support where there is always the possibility to vary a parenting plan or child support.

Cohen Buchan Edwards are experts in the collaborative divorce process and have successfully helped many couples end their relationships in this collaborative and low-cost alternative to traditional divorce. Find out more about how collaborative divorce works and call or email Cohen Buchan Edwards LLP, 604.273.6411, for a free consultation.

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