Letisha Reimer, 13, was fatally stabbed at Abbotsford Senior Secondary on Nov. 1, 2016. (Facebook photo)

Letisha Reimer, 13, was fatally stabbed at Abbotsford Senior Secondary on Nov. 1, 2016. (Facebook photo)

Abbotsford school killer says he saw ‘monsters’ when he stabbed 2 girls

Gabriel Klein testifies on first day of ‘not criminally responsible’ hearing

Convicted killer Gabriel Klein testified in court on Monday morning (Nov. 9) that he stabbed two girls, killing one, at an Abbotsford high school in 2016 because he thought one was a zombie and the other was a witch.

“I don’t know how to explain why I acted on my thoughts. I didn’t know these girls, I wasn’t angry at these girls … I felt like the voices in my head gained control over me,” he said.

A hearing is being held in B.C. Supreme Court in New Westminster to determine whether Klein was “not criminally responsible due to a mental disorder” (NCRMD) at the time he killed Letisha Reimer, 13, on Nov. 1, 2016 and seriously injured her 14-year-old friend (who can’t be named due to a publication ban).

The pair were attacked while they were sitting in the rotunda of Abbotsford Senior Secondary.

A trial into the matter concluded earlier this year, at which time the NCRMD defence was not used. In March, Klein was convicted of second-degree murder and aggravated assault. His sentencing hearing was scheduled to take place Sept. 23 and 24, but, instead, the families of the two girls were informed the week before that Klein had been granted an NCRMD hearing.

The proceedings began Monday and are expected to run for eight more days in November and December.

Under questioning by defence lawyer Martin Peters, Klein, who was 21 at the time of the stabbings, said he first began hearing voices in his head at the age of 16, and they grew increasingly worse over the years.

He said he heard two or three voices on a daily basis, and he described hearing a “good voice” and a “bad voice.”

“I felt like these voices controlled my life … I felt like the bad voice would torture me, push me to doing wrong,” Klein said.

He said he began having delusions in the fall of 2016 – when he was living in Alberta – that he was being followed by white supremacists, the Hells Angels and the RCMP, so he fled to Vancouver and then to Abbotsford.

While in the community, Klein illegally crossed the border at one point – another effort to keep away from this pursuers, he said. After his release back to Canada, he went to Abbotsford Regional Hospital because he thought his brain was “swollen” and that he might have meningitis.

He said he also told a social worker that he was suicidal, but he was released “without any treatment whatsoever.”

Klein said he was referred to the Lookout homeless shelter in Abbotsford, where he stayed overnight.

The next day was Nov. 1, 2016, and he said he woke up feeling “very depressed,” angry about his situation and hearing voices again.

He said he shoplifted alcohol from a local liquor store and took three “shots.”

Evidence presented at Klein’s trial indicated that he then stole a hunting knife from the local Cabela’s store, but he did not touch on this during his testimony on Monday.

RELATED: Gabriel Klein guilty of 2nd-degree murder in Abbotsford high school stabbing

Klein said he then began making his way to Abbotsford Community Library — located inside of Abbotsford Senior Secondary – because he wanted to access a computer to contact his mom, who has since died, and let her know he was feeling suicidal.

While walking down the street, he said he was screaming and yelling and stepping into traffic. He continued to hear the voices in his head, and thought shadows were following him, he said.

Klein said when he arrived at the library, he couldn’t find a seat, so he sat down in the school rotunda.

“As soon as I sat down and looked to my left, I saw two people that I describe as monsters,” he said.

Klein described one as looking like a zombie with maggots coming out of her back and the other as a witch.

He said he heard a voice named “Lucy” yelling, “Kill! Kill! Kill!”

Klein said he took the knife out of his backpack, unsheathed it and first stabbed the “zombie” and then the “witch.” The second victim, who was Reimer and had been stabbed 14 times, fell to the ground. Klein said he dropped the knife and heard a voice in his head say, “You’re going to hell now.”

He sat down and was tackled by the school principal. Klein said he quickly realized it was two girls, not monsters, that he had stabbed. It was while he was in the police car after his arrest that he felt remorse and sadness, he said.

But Klein said he later became uncooperative with authorities and refused to talk.

“I felt like I completely bottomed out and lost everything in my life. That’s why I didn’t want to cooperate – I felt like I had nothing left,” he said.

Klein said he has been housed at the Forensic Psychiatric Hospital in Coquitlam for the last three years and his current treatment regimen has resulted in him no longer hearing voices or having hallucinations or delusions.

The Crown’s cross-exam of Klein began on Monday afternoon.

The courts previously heard that Klein was diagnosed with schizophrenia and delusions. He was at first found unfit to stand trial, but was then found fit in January 2019.

RELATED: No defence witnesses in trial of man charged in killing of Abbotsford student

RELATED: Accused Abbotsford school killer found fit to stand trial



vhopes@abbynews.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

BC Supreme Courtcrime

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

 

Gabriel Klein sits in the prisoner’s dock during the first day of his trial on Oct. 7, 2019 in B.C. Supreme Court in New Westminster. (Sketch by Felicity Don)

Gabriel Klein sits in the prisoner’s dock during the first day of his trial on Oct. 7, 2019 in B.C. Supreme Court in New Westminster. (Sketch by Felicity Don)

Just Posted

Wickson Pier in Crescent Beach is closed to the public, as work to replace and repair piles continues. (Susan Richards de Wit photo)
PHOTOS: Repairs to Crescent Beach pier complete

$180,000 Wickson Pier project included pile replacement, says City of Surrey parks manager

Steve ‘Elvis’ Elliott performs for residents of Amica White Rock. Exercise-to-music programs that led to a threat of city fines due to a noise complaint are to resume next week. (Contributed file photo)
COVID-19 outbreak declared at Amica White Rock

Peace Portal Seniors Village outbreak declared over

B.C.’s parliament buildings in Victoria. (Photo: Tom Fletcher)
Surrey gets two cabinet ministers, a parliamentary secretary and government whip

Premier John Horgan’s NDP MLAs were sworn in on Tuesday and the cabinet was revealed Thursday afternoon

The Festival of Lights; Jingle Bell White Rock; and the Lighted Boat Parade all helped light up the White Rock waterfront on Saturday, Dec. 7. (Aaron Hinks photo)
White Rock Festival of Lights postponed

While event founder remains optimistic, the future of this year’s display is uncertain

Surrey city Councillor Brenda Locke. (File photo)
Brenda Locke trying to breathe life into Surrey’s defunct Public Safety Committee

Surrey councillor’s motion will be up for debate at a future council meeting

B.C. Health Minister Adrian Dix and provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry update the COVID-19 situation at the B.C. legislature, Nov. 23, 2020. (B.C. government)
B.C. sets another COVID-19 record with 887 new cases

Another 13 deaths, ties the highest three days ago

Arthur Topham has been sentenced to one month of house arrest and three years of probation after breaching the terms of his probation. Topham was convicted of promoting hate against Jewish people in 2015. (Photo submitted)
Quesnel man convicted for anti-Semitic website sentenced to house arrest for probation breach

Arthur Topham was convicted of breaching probation following his 2017 sentence for promoting hatred

Langley School District's board office. (Langley Advance Times files)
‘Sick Out’ aims to pressure B.C. schools over masks, class sizes

Parents from Langley and Surrey are worried about COVID safety in classrooms

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good
Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good

Pay it Forward program supports local businesses in their community giving

The baby boy born to Gillian and Dave McIntosh of Abbotsford was released from hospital on Wednesday (Nov. 25) while Gillian continues to fight for her life after being diagnosed with COVID-19.
B.C. mom with COVID-19 still fighting for life while newborn baby now at home

Son was delivered Nov. 10 while Gillian McIntosh was in an induced coma

B.C. Premier John Horgan, a Star Trek fan, can’t resist a Vulcan salute as he takes the oath of office for a second term in Victoria, Nov. 26, 2020. (B.C. government)
Horgan names 20-member cabinet with same pandemic team

New faces in education, finance, economic recovery

A new ‘soft reporting’ room is opening inside the Ann Davis Transition Society offices on Dec. 1, 2020 which is thought to be the first of its kind in B.C. (Ann Davis Transitional Society/ Facebook)
New ‘trauma-informed’ reporting room opening next week in Chilliwack

It’s a space for reporting domestic violence, sexual assault, or gender-based violence to police

The corporate headquarters of Pfizer Canada are seen in Montreal, Monday, Nov. 9, 2020. The chief medical adviser at Health Canada says Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine could be approved in Canada next month. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz
Health Canada expects first COVID-19 vaccine to be approved next month

Canada has a purchase deal to buy at least 20 million doses of Pfizer’s vaccine,

Most Read