RCMP crest. (Black Press Media files)

B.C. traveller fined $1,000 for not following mandatory social-isolation rules

RCMP have had to follow up with more than 2,000 home visits to ensure COVID-19 law being followed

A Richmond resident has been fined $1,000 for not following federal and provincial orders to self-isolate for 14 days after arriving in Canada from international travelling.

The fine is one of four tickets that have been issued for failing to follow the Quarantine Act since it was brought into effect in late-March, the Public Health Agency of Canada confirmed to Black Press Media on Thursday (May 21).

Anyone who enters Canada from outside of the country must self-isolate for 14 days in order to reduce the possibility of spreading COVID-19.

Since then, RCMP has been tasked by the Public Health Agency of Canada to help enforce self-isolation procedures, by showing up at residences if health officials cannot get in contact with the person by phone or email.

As of May 13, nearly 2,200 home visits were made to ensure recently arrived Canadians were complying with the rules.

That includes 254 checks in B.C. that were specifically requested from the federal health agency, data shows.

More than 4,500 people have been ticketed or charged on separate occasions for alleged COVID-19 related violations across Canada.

ALSO READ: ‘There can be no ambiguity’: Travellers brought home to B.C. must self-isolate

“Local law enforcement, based on their expertise and operational requirements, will follow-up as they view most appropriate, and may not always report back the results to PHAC,” a statement from the public health agency said in a statement. “Even if they find a violation, they may choose to use a different instrument for enforcement.”

Provinces have implemented individual approaches to handling those who don’t follow the rules. In B.C., travellers must have a substantial plan on how they will stay in quarantine upon arrival to Vancouver International Airport in order to be allowed to continue home.

More than 14,500 people returned to B.C. from April 15 to April 30, by air travel or at land borders, according to the most recent data available from the province. Of those, 500 travellers who didn’t respond to self-isolation check-ins were visited by police at request of provincial health officials.

As the country slowly eases social contact restrictions in individual provinces, many Canadians are watching closely for when the federal government decides to open its borders up again, specifically with the U.S.

Health officials have said it is too soon to say what that reopening plan would look like, and what requirements or protocols would be involved.

“As we look to the future, and we think of opening up our borders and increasing travel volumes, we will need to be ever vigilant in our approach,” the federal health agency said.

“We continue to trust Canadians to make the right decisions and do their part to stop the spread of COVID-19.”


@ashwadhwani
ashley.wadhwani@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Want to support local journalism during the pandemic? Make a donation here.

Coronavirus

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Local Chinese Canadians aim to counter COVID-19 backlash

Few racist incidents on Peninsula, says Community Engagement Society

Surrey to pay TransLink $30M in land, $9M in cash for work on cancelled LRT

Council considered staff report on city’s 2019 annual financial statements during Monday’s “virtual” council meeting

Surrey RCMP promise enforcement at unofficial show ‘n’ shines

Cars have been impounded at the site in the last two years

‘There’s no playbook for this’: South Surrey sports organizations await approval to return to play

Local associations planning for modified summer seasons as COVID-19 restrictions ease

Facing changes together: Your community, your journalists

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the world in ways that would have… Continue reading

B.C. retirement home creates innovative ‘meet-up’ unit for elderly to see family face-to-face

Innovative ‘purpose-built’ unit keeps residents safe when seeing family for first time since COVID-19

Fraser Valley libraries to offer contactless hold pick-ups

FVRL Express — Click, Pick, Go service to be offered at all 25 locations starting June 1

B.C.’s essential grocery, hardware store employees should get pandemic pay: retail group

Only B.C.’s social, health and corrections workers are eligible for top-ups

Edmonton, Vancouver and Toronto vying to be NHL hubs, but there’s a catch

The NHL unveiled a return-to-play plan that would feature 24 teams

B.C. sees 9 new COVID-19 cases, one death as officials watch for new cases amid Phase Two

Number of confirmed active cases is at 244, with 37 people in hospital

Nanaimo senior clocked going 50 km/hr over limit says her SUV shouldn’t be impounded

RCMP say they can’t exercise discretion when it comes to excessive speeding tickets

United Way allocating $6.6M in federal funding to help with food security, youth mental health

Applications from Fraser Valley and Lower Mainland charities being accepted for the emergency funding

Illicit-drug deaths up in B.C. and remain highest in Canada: chief coroner

More than 4,700 people have died of overdoses since B.C. declared a public health emergency in early 2016

CMHC sees declines in home prices, sales, starts that will linger to end of 2022

CMHC said average housing prices could fall anywhere from nine to 18 per cent in its forecast

Most Read

l -->