Tim Shields. (File photo)

UPDATE: Complainant describes details of ex-RCMP Tim Shields’ alleged sexual assault

Former civilian employee claims former Mountie assaulted her in a bathroom

The complainant in Tim Shields’ trial described in court on Tuesday how the former RCMP spokesman allegedly sexually assaulted her in a work bathroom.

The woman, who cannot be named because of a publication ban, told the judge it occurred during the fall of 2009, on the same day as a weekly strategic communications meeting. The complainant had come by Shields’ office at E Division in Vancouver to update him on a work matter and say hello.

READ: Ex-RCMP officer Tim Shields’ trial hears from alleged victim

She alleges Shields, whom she reported to as a civilian employee, told her he had something to tell her, but did not indicate what this was.

“He led me out of the strategic communications section to the hallway, down a flight of stairs, to a unisex bathroom on the main floor,” the complainant said.

“Then he locked the door. It was shocking feeling.”

READ: Complainant to describe sexual comments in former Mountie’ case

She testified that Shields kissed her and asked her, “Don’t we have good chemistry?”

The complainant said she did not respond.

“He had went under my blouse, undid my blouse, touched my breasts,” she said. “He then unbuttoned my pants, [was] trying to unzip my pants. I pushed his hands away said ‘no let’s go.’”

At that moment, the complainant said, Shields offered to perform oral sex on her.

“I said no,” she told the court. “I was feeling scared, panicky, kind of surreal… it was weird and scary.

She alleges that Shields then took a couple steps back before unzipping his pants and exposing himself.

Shields put her hand on his penis, she said, and asked her to perform oral sex.

The complainant described feeling “disgusted.”

“I was freaking out, pushed his hands away and said ‘No, let’s go, we’re in a bathroom.’”

She said he zipped his pants up and told her to not forget to do up her bra, before instructing her to check if anyone was outside.

When she did so, the complainant said she left the bathroom, collected her belongings from the building and headed to her downtown office. Before she left the bathroom, she said Shields told her not to tell anyone about the encounter “because it would be bad for him.”

There, the complainant alleged that Shields called her on her office phone to tell her that “he could still smell me on his hands” and “how hot it was.”

There were also text messages sent by Shields, the complainant said. She couldn’t recall the exact wording but referred to them as sexual in nature.

The trial, which started on June 7, is expected to last three weeks. Shields’ defence lawyer is to cross-examine the complainant on Wednesday.

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