Marine artist John Horton (standing at the podium) presents the City of Delta with his painting “Arrival at Port Guichon” during a council meeting on Monday, Oct. 28, 2019. (City of Delta photo)

Marine artist John Horton (standing at the podium) presents the City of Delta with his painting “Arrival at Port Guichon” during a council meeting on Monday, Oct. 28, 2019. (City of Delta photo)

Delta artist John Horton named to Order of British Columbia

Honour for significant contributions made to the appreciation and safety of B.C.’s coastal history

Local marine artist and search and rescue volunteer John Malcolm Horton is one of 13 people chosen to receive the province’s highest honour this year.

Horton is being recognized for the significant contributions he has made to the appreciation and safety of B.C.’s coastal history and its waters through his paintings showcased in collections across Canada, commemorative coin designs for the Canadian Mint, and a lifetime of volunteer service to keep mariners safe, according to a biography provided by the B.C. government.

“In his outstanding paintings — over 1,400 in number — Horton depicts the history of the coast of B.C., bringing to life the historic voyages of captains Cook and Vancouver. His work has attracted the attention of officials at the Department of National Defence who selected him to produce paintings of Canadian warships serving in the Arabian Gulf and on international exercises,” the bio states.

In February, Horton was presented with the 2020 Delta Friends of Heritage Award for promoting awareness of Delta’s maritime heritage through art.

Horton’s painting “Arrival at Port Guichon” was purchased by a small group of residents led by former mayor Doug Husband after four years of fundraising and donated to the city last October. Horton, in turn, donated half the proceeds from the sale to the Delta Heritage Society.

“Arrival at Port Guichon” was inspired by a photograph dated circa 1903 taken from the bank of the Fraser River and features the Victorian ferry arriving at the Port Guichon wharf, Delta’s first port. The painting also shows the Victoria Terminal Railway train, the Guichon family home and marine vessels carrying potatoes and salmon down the river, giving life to Delta’s connection to the Fraser River and to the Port Guichon wharf, which played an important role in the development of Ladner.

SEE ALSO: North Delta’s history explored in new first-of-its-kind book

In recognition of his marine art, Horton is the only Canadian artist mentioned in the late Dennis Brook-Hart’s definitive book, Twentieth Century Marine Painting. He is a founding member of the Canadian Society of Marine Artists and member of the Federation of Canadian Artists, the Naval Officers Association of B.C. and the Honourable Company of Master Mariners. Through his art, he has supported many schools, museums, hospitals and community-based charities.

Equally significant, however, is his long-time volunteer work in marine search and rescue.

Horton has been active in the Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary, Canadian Lifeboat Institution, Royal Naval Sailing Association (B.C.), Royal Canadian Sea Cadets and the Naval Officers Association of B.C.

“Since joining the Canadian Marine Rescue Auxiliary in 1979, his focus has been on assisting the native and commercial fisheries in B.C. along with any other mariners in distress. Volunteering under the auxiliary flag, he has assisted in the rescue of hundreds of vessels either in distress or disabled,” the bio states.

In 1988, Horton began volunteering with the Canadian Lifeboat Institution, a not-for-profit, nationally registered charitable marine search and rescue (SAR) organization that provides secondary SAR services (“vessel of opportunity” assistance, safety patrols, public boating information, etc.), and assists primary SAR organizations like the Canadian Coast Guard and its auxiliary,Royal Canadian Marine Search and Rescue, to save those in peril in the Lower Fraser River and Gulf of Georgia.

Horton purchased what would become the Steveston Lifeboat that same year, and has devoted thousands of hours — and his own money — to maintaining the 52-foot vessel. From its long-time base in Steveston, and its more recent home in Ladner, Horton has trained numerous volunteers to be competent crew members on the now-renamed Delta Lifeboat and responded to 600 incidents.

“[The lifeboat]’s safety role to the fishing fleet in the Gulf of Georgia and Fraser Estuary cannot be over-estimated; to date almost 900 incidents have been attended by Horton aboard the Delta Lifeboat.”

Horton is one of 13 British Columbians being named to the order this year. Others being honoured include crooner Michael Bublé, developer Ryan Beedie and Mel Krajden, medical director of the BCCDC Public Health Laboratory.

The full list of this year’s honourees and their biographies can be be found at here.

Lt.-Gov. Janet Austin, chancellor of the order, said she was “delighted to welcome 13 new members to the order.”

“They have helped us to grow as a province, taught us to care for our environment, enriched our lives with literature and art, helped us to address past injustices and inspired us to become a more caring and inclusive society. To recognize these remarkable people, who are changing our communities for the better in many ways, is an honour of great personal significance to me,” Austin said.

Premier John Horgan also congratulated the 13 honourees.

“As we celebrate B.C. Day, I want to recognize the efforts, achievements and accomplishments of this year’s Order of British Columbia recipients,” Horgan said. “Congratulations on receiving this well-deserved honour. Your many contributions have enriched the lives of British Columbians and helped make our province an even better place.”

There were 160 British Columbians nominated this year, part of more than 5,900 nominations the province has received in the 31 years since the order’s inception.

In total, 460 people have been appointed to the order, with members representing all regions of the province in numbers generally proportionate to a region’s population.

The Order of British Columbia is normally handed out during a ceremony at Government House in Victoria on B.C. Day, but due to the ongoing pandemic, this year’s honourees will receive theirs in 2021.

— with files from Katya Slepian



editor@northdeltareporter.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

DeltaLadnerSouth Delta

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

 

John M. Horton (centre), the artist behind the painting “Arrival at Port Guichon,” was awarded a Delta Friends of Heritage Award by Mayor George Harvie and Heritage Advisory Commission chair Coun. Jeannie Kanakos on Monday, Feb. 24, 2020. (City of Delta photo)

John M. Horton (centre), the artist behind the painting “Arrival at Port Guichon,” was awarded a Delta Friends of Heritage Award by Mayor George Harvie and Heritage Advisory Commission chair Coun. Jeannie Kanakos on Monday, Feb. 24, 2020. (City of Delta photo)

Just Posted

Residents of 15156 Victoria Ave. say they’re at risk of losing their affordable housing, from left, Elizabeth Soper, Jack, Jane, Dan, Anthony. (Aaron Hinks photo)
White Rock tenants, landlord to go to RTB hearing over ‘renoviction’

Low-income tenants dispute claim they must relocate for work to be completed

A woman crosses 176th Street in Cloverdale April 12, 2021. 176th will not host Cloverdale Market Days this year as the popular street fest is just the latest casualty in the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. (Photo: Malin Jordan)
Cloverdale Market Days cancelled again

Organizer says popular street fest will return in 2022

Researchers say residents should leave sleeping bats alone while they exit hibernation. (Cathy Koot photo)
Spring ‘signal’ brings White Rock, Surrey bats out of hibernation

Community Bat Programs of BC says it’s best to leave sleeping bats alone

Marchers supporting Indian farmers rallied in Surrey last month, from Bear Creek Park to Holland Park along King George Boulevard. (File photo: Tom Zillich)
Surrey MP says mayor’s motion to support Indian farmers is his to make

“He has his own sovereignty, right,” Sukh Dhaliwal says

Crescent Beach Marina was ordered closed on April 12 due to COVID-19, according to Fraser Health. (Contributed photo)
Two South Surrey businesses among several shuttered for at least 10 days due to COVID-19

Fraser Health posting list of workplaces closed under new public health order

A woman wears a protective face covering to help prevent the spread of COVID-19 as she walks past the emergency entrance of Vancouver General Hospital in Vancouver, B.C., Friday, April 9, 2021. COVID-19 cases have been on a steady increase in the province of British Columbia over the past week. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Top doctor warns B.C.’s daily cases could reach 3,000 as COVID hospitalizations surge

There are more than 400 people in hospital, with 125 of them in ICU

The father of Aaliyah Rosa planted a tree and laid a plaque in her memory in 2018. (Langley Advance Times files)
Final witness will extend Langley child murder trial into May or June

Lengthy trial began last autumn with COVID and other factors forcing it to take longer than expected

The corner of 96th Avenue and Glover Road in Fort Langley now has traffic signals, and new “touchless” signal activation buttons. (Matthew Claxton/Langley Advance Times)
Busy Fort Langley intersection gets ‘touchless’ crosswalk signals

The new traffic light started operation in April

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

A crossing guard stops traffic as students wearing face masks to curb the spread of COVID-19 arrive at Ecole Woodward Hill Elementary School, in Surrey, B.C., on Tuesday, February 23, 2021. A number of schools in the Fraser Health region, including Woodward Hill, have reported cases of the B.1.7.7 COVID-19 variant first detected in the U.K. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
COVID-infected students in Lower Mainland schools transmitting to 1 to 2 others: data

Eight to 13 per cent of COVID cases among students in the Lower Mainland were acquired in schools, B.C. says

Dr. Bonnie Henry – in a B.C. health order that went into effect April 12 – granted WorkSafe inspectors the power to enforce workplace closures with COVID-19 spread. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
24 workplace closures being enforced in Fraser Health under new COVID-19 order

WorkSafe inspectors the power to enforce closures if COVID-19 has spread to 3 or more employees

Maple Ridge Fire and Rescue were conducting training operations at Gold Creek Falls when a firefighter broke their leg. (Eileen Robinson photo - Special to The News)
Firefighter suffers broken leg during swift water rescue practice in Golden Ears park

A training exercise at Maple Ridge waterfall on Wedesday results in mishap

Norm Scott, president of Royal Canadian Legion Branch # 91, is disappointed the Legion does not qualify for COVID financial assistance from the provincial government. (Black Press Media file photo)
B.C.’s pandemic aid package passing Legion branches by

Federal non-profit status stymies provincial assistance eligibility

Most Read