A rendering of the proposed Delta casino. (City of Delta photo)

Delta casino one step closer to approval

The development proposal will go to public hearing in Ladner on May 1

Delta’s casino is one step closer to approval, after council gave first and second reading to the proposed development on Monday, April 9.

“I haven’t decided one way or another,” Counc. Jeannie Kanakos said about the development. “I think it’s probably one of the more important decisions I would ever make in my 12 years as a councillor.

“There have been many who’ve said this is not in the Delta brand … We heard that lots. So I’m waiting to hear more at the public hearing.”

The casino proposal would see the redevelopment of the Town & Country Inn site off River Road and 60th Avenue in Ladner. The proposal includes an up-to-124-room hotel, two restaurants with outdoor patios, a buffet, meeting facilities and a six-storey gaming facility, with two storeys dedicated for 801 parking spots and 25 bicycle parking spots.

The look of the casino has evolved since its first application to council, and now includes a water feature at the front of the building, extensive landscaping of the site and the possible use of public art.

RELATED: A first look at Delta’s proposed casino

Delta’s casino would be considered a small- to medium-sized facility based on provincial standards. However, 10 per cent of the net gaming revenues would come to the city once the casino was up and running, the same as others in the province.

According to an estimate done by the B.C. Lottery Corporation, the proposed casino would bring in between $2.5 and $3 million in revenue to Delta each year. If the proposal is given final approval, the casino would be eligible for a tax exemption, meaning property tax would be frozen at the 2018 level of $157,000 for up to five years.

However, a staff report noted that this exemption is discretionary and would be “offset significantly by the future property taxes generated as a result of the new entertainment complex.”

The proposal has been in the works for more than a year. In November 2016, the B.C. Lottery Corporation announced that Delta would be the home of a new casino south of the Fraser River, as part of a relocation and expansion of Surrey’s Newton Community Gaming Centre.

In September 2017, the Town & Country Inn site was given preliminary approval as the site of the proposed casino. Gateway Casinos and Entertainment Ltd. submitted an application to rezone the property in November 2017.

Between November 2017 and February 2018, teh City of Delta and Gateway Casinos held a number of independent public information meetings and gathered feedback from the public.

RELATED: Opinions mixed at North Delta casino info session

In total, about 425 people attended the information meetings put on by the city. Overall, comments showed people were concerned about potential traffic problems, a possible increase in crime, money laundering and the impact on residents in the surrounding area.

A traffic impact study found that the current roads would be able to accommodate casino and hotel traffic, which would mostly occur outside of peak hours.

Residents also commented on potential social issues, such as gambling addiction.

“There is a whole issue relating to the social and health issues relating to casinos,” Kanakos said, noting that members of Fraser Health offered to come and discuss public health problems in relation to gaming facilities.

“I think information is power. I think it would be helpful to have the doctors come speak to us in a workshop. I think it would be helpful in this journey, for understanding the health implications of this kind of facility.”

RELATED: Delta business owners worried proposed casino could cause shortage of workers

Significant concerns were also raised about the loss of the indoor tennis courts at the Town & Country Inn site. More than 20 people wrote letters to the city about the potential loss of the courts, and the impact it would have on the tennis community in Delta and Surrey. Many of the writers wanted the city to require the Gateway Casinos to provide a community amenity contribution to replace the tennis facility.

“It has served as an important recreation facility,” Kanakos said. “I don’t think it’s good enough to say it’s in the private sector … I think we need to step up on that front and help out. But we need more information.”

Counc. Heather King asked for a list of tennis facilities in Delta, as well as ones that are lit at night, and who the loss of the court would impact. She suggested it might be possible to put a roof over an existing tennis facility, like the Delta Lacrosse Association did at one of their outdoor lacrosse fields.

The City of Richmond remains strongly opposed to a casino so close to the city borders, and the Semiahmoo First Nation also wrote to Delta to state its opposition to the project.

Mayor Lois Jackson noted that Richmond had “very interesting and scathing comments in some regard.” Delta had not received any further communication from Richmond after Delta’s response was sent two weeks ago.

The first and second readings for the proposal were approved unanimously by council on Monday, April 9, although council requested staff look into a number of questions about the proposal, including safety along the Millennium Trail in Ladner, a potential tennis facility, updated crime statistics around casinos, potential new jobs and where gaming revenues could potentially go in the municipality.

The casino proposal is set to go to a public hearing on May 1 at 6 p.m. at the Ladner Community Centre. After the public hearing, council will reconvene to discuss the public’s comments and give it third reading.

If it passes third reading, the application will be referred to BCLC and the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure for approval. If approved, it would go back to the city for final consideration and adoption.



grace.kennedy@northdeltareporter.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

B.C. scientist bringing seabird conservation to the forefront at international congress

Bird Studies Canada’s David Bradley is co-convening a symposium on biosecurity for island species

‘Beauty amongst such tragedy:’ B.C. photographer captures nature’s trifecta

David Luggi’s photo from a beach in Fraser Lake shows Shovel Lake wildfire, Big Dipper and an aurora

Eagle tree cut down in South Surrey for ‘The Eagles’ development

Planned eagle preserve ‘a first for City of Surrey’

Air quality advisory continues in the Lower Mainland

Smoke from Interior fires brings fine particulate

Fast food chains look to capitalize on vegetarian, vegan trend with new items

Seven per cent of Canadians consider themselves vegetarians and 2.3 per cent identify as vegans

B.C. swimmer halts journey across Strait of Juan de Fuca after hypothermia sets in

Victoria MS athlete Susan Simmons swam for eight-and-a-half hours in 9 C choppy waters

‘Hard on water:’ Smoke not the only long-range effect of wildfires

The project began more than 10 years ago after southern Alberta’s 2003 Lost Creek fire

B.C. VIEWS: Genuine aboriginal rights can be misused and discredited

Camp Cloud one of long line of protests falsely asserting title

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to march in Montreal’s Pride parade

Trudeau will end the day in his home riding of Papineau

Vancouver Whitecaps give up late goal in 2-2 draw with New York Red Bulls

Four of Vancouver’s next five games are at home

B.C. man designer behind Canucks’ retro jersey

Jeremie White was 20 years old when he told Canucks assistant GM Brian Burke he had a design

Lions give up late TD in 24-23 loss to Argos

B.C. falls to 3-5, fumbling away last-minute chance in Toronto

Most Read

l -->