DPD Const. Michael Grandia (left) presenting at annual Tsawwassen First Nation⁩ members gathering on Oct. 13, 2018. (Michael Grandia/Twitter photo)

Delta police officer wins B.C. crime prevention award

Const. Michael Grandia one of five winners of 2018 Community Safety and Crime Prevention Awards

A Delta police officer has won a provincial crime prevention award for his work with Tsawwassen First Nation.

Const. Michael Grandia was awarded the Crime Prevention and Community Safety Award, which recognizes exemplary leadership through developing innovative projects and key activities or initiatives to promote safe communities, according to a government press release.

Grandia, who has served with the department for 12 years, works within the DPD’s operational support branch, and is assigned to Tsawwassen First Nation. He was selected as the winner of this year’s award for his work in developing the YoBro/YoGirl program (part of the TFN’s Crime Stoppers program), campaigning for mental health awareness and helping the community on issues such as substance use, education, justice-based and youth programming, and community wellness.

Const. Grandia was one of five people honoured as part of the province’s 21st annual Community Safety and Crime Prevention Awards. The awards acknowledge volunteers, non-profit organizations and other local public safety partners for their work to reduce crime, violence and victimization in the community and support law enforcement and others in the justice sector.

SEE ALSO: Delta officers, residents honoured at police awards

“These awards show everyone that each of us can make a difference to prevent crime, help victims of violence and make our communities safer,” Mike Farnworth, minister of public safety and solicitor general, said in a press release. “On behalf of the province, I want to thank each of our award winners for the perseverance, commitment and passion they bring to their work.”

The award presentation kicked off Crime Prevention Week, which runs Nov. 1 through 7.

Chilliwack’s Patti MacAhonic, executive director of the Ann Davis Transition Society, won the Award of Distinction for her more than three decades of work reducing crime, enhancing community safety and supporting victims of crime and violence.

MacAhonic has set up temporary shelter housing for more than 135 women this year, along with opening a permanent specialized transition house. She has been active in raising awareness for domestic violence, women’s homelessness, women’s equality and prevention work, and has lobbied for legislative change for survivors and their children.

Brenda Lochhead of Vancouver won this year’s Services to Victims Award celebrating exemplary leadership in providing services and supports to victims.

Lochhead has more than 25 years of experience in the anti-violence sector, where she supports victims in the Vancouver Police Department’s counter exploitation unit, providing services to victims of sexual exploitation and human trafficking. She was also instrumental in the development and implementation of a co-ordination framework for supporting trafficked and exploited individuals that has been recognized by other policing agencies.

Mohammed Imtiaz Asin of Richmond is the recipient of this year’s Youth Leadership Award, which recognizes exceptional leadership and commitment to working with youth.

Imtiaz Asin has supported youth for more than two decades, delivering workshops on teen suicide and gang violence, and providing sports activities to help empower Muslim youth and build their confidence. He is the vice-president of youth development services for the BC Muslim Association, working to ensure youth stay connected with their culture. In 2013, Imtiaz Asin was selected by the U.S. Cultural Consulate Office to represent Canada in a state-funded program to understand the importance of cultural awareness and civic engagement.

Abbotsford’s Joanne Field won the Restorative Justice Memorial Award, which recognizes commitment to innovative partnerships that have advanced the work of restorative justice.

Field helped found the Abbotsford Restorative Justice and Advocacy Association in 2001, where she has been the executive director for the past six years. She has worked on several initiatives to raise awareness for restorative justice and has won several awards for her work with youth. Field also sits on numerous boards and committees, the including Abbotsford Youth Commission and the Abbotsford School District’s drug prevention committee.

SEE ALSO: Delta officer receives highest police honour in B.C.



editor@northdeltareporter.com

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