Since January 2019, the Delta Police Department has been training and equipping officers with a 40-mm foam projectile launcher. The launcher will provide officers with an intermediate less-lethal use-of-force option when responding to high-risk calls. (Delta Police Department photo)

Delta police roll out less-lethal foam projectile launcher

Launcher provides officers with an intermediate use-of-force option on high-risk calls

Delta police are letting the public know about a new tool officers have to safely resolve high-risk situations.

Since January of this year, the Delta Police Department has been training and equipping officers with a 40-mm foam projectile launcher, also called an impact weapon. The launchers will provide officers with an intermediate less-lethal use-of-force option when responding to high-risk calls.

“The key thing about this equipment is that it allows our officers to maintain or create distance, buy time and build options toward a safe resolution when immediate action isn’t required,” DPD Deputy Chief Norm Lipinski said in a press release. “It’s not likely that the public will often see our officers carrying or using these weapons, as they are intended for use in high risk situations. However, we wanted to be open about this change in our equipment as the weapon is very distinctive looking, with a bright green barrel.”

The launcher is replacing what are commonly known as bean bag guns as it offers advantages such as advanced optics and better accuracy. The projectile has a plastic body with a foam or sponge nose and is spin-stabilized, giving it a higher degree of accuracy over distance. The most common injury a person would receive from this weapon is bruising, swelling and physical discomfort.

“The trend in law enforcement across North America is to move to progressive weapon options such as this. In a high-risk situation officers may be able to keep an appropriate distance from a person, which should give more opportunity to safely talk and de-escalate the situation if possible,” Lipinski said.

Lipinski stressed that the addition of the launcher will not alter the department’s emphasis on the importance of communication first, whenever possible in a given situation.

The press release notes DPD officers receive comprehensive de-escalation training and, when possible, will first speak or otherwise communicate with a person and determine how to best keep everyone safe.

Since roll out of the launcher began in January, it has only been used once, though not on a person.

The DPD is moving to equip and train all front-line officers working in sections such as patrol and traffic.



editor@northdeltareporter.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

Dog rescued from South Surrey house fire

Firefighters dispatched to 19400-block of 0 Avenue

Surrey developer says second Central City office tower doesn’t need to be taller

Application for second 25-storey tower at mall sent back to staff by Surrey council for being ‘way too low’

Minor injuries after South Surrey student struck in school crosswalk

Collision ‘a reminder to drivers, pedestrians to take safety seriously’

Rec centre staff honoured for their help to revive teen who collapsed in weight room

BC Emergency Health Services presented Vital Link awards to four City of Surrey employees on Sunday

Surrey tops list of most delayed, congested TransLink bus routes

TransLink says delays are costing $75 million a year

Second young woman dies after rollover crash near Williams Lake

‘Someone’s going to get her heart, which is awesome, because she has the best heart in the world’

Google searches for ‘how to vote’ surge on Election Day

Interest spikes despite social media campaign by Elections Canada

Police watchdog seeking ‘key witness’ in Taser incident along Vancouver seawall

Independent Investigations Office of B.C. looking for woman who was sitting nearby with dog

Alberta man pleads guilty, fined for hunting without a licence in North Island

It’s the responsibility of each hunter or angler to know whether they are considered a B.C. Resident.

B.C. mayor apologizes for removal of Queen’s portrait from council chambers

‘I prefer to be inclusive of the many aspects of our history’

Alcohol a possible factor in crash that killed 17-year-old girl near Williams Lake

A pickup truck left the road and rolled over on Highway 20 on the weekend

Rare bird spotted in Victoria draws enthusiasts from across the continent

It’s the first time a yellow-browed warbler has been reported on the mainland of North America

B.C. woman must pay $1,000 after unleashed dog bites another

Owner should never have left Bibi unattended, tribunal member wrote

Most Read

l -->