Dirty White Rock tap water ‘absolutely disgusting’

Resident Derek Sigurdson says water quality ‘unacceptable’ in this day and time

A resident on the west side of White Rock says he’s struggling to write a letter to the city that will properly express his dismay over the dirty water that came from his household taps Monday morning.

Derek Sigurdson, who lives on Coldicutt Avenue, was leaving his house on his way to work when he was stopped by a neighbour carrying a glass of brown water.

“He said, ‘does your water look like this?’” Sigurdson told Peace Arch News. “I said no and he said, ‘I think you’d better check.’”

When Sigurdson ran his taps, what he saw was enough to make him take pictures and video (www.peacearchnews.com) of what was running into his sink.

“It was absolutely disgusting – it looked like coffee,” he said. “We’ve experienced turbidity in the water before… but this is the worst I’ve seen it.”

Sigurdson said others in his neighbourhood have experienced similar problems, and noted he has heard that their water comes from the Oxford reservoir, where city leaders have said chloramination of city water in combination with manganese seems to be resulting in a number of cases of severe water discoloration.

The city is currently studying the most effective way to disinfect White Rock’s water and has earmarked $14.2 million to build facilities that will treat naturally occurring arsenic and manganese in the water, due to be completed in 2019.

Whatever the reasons for the colour, Sigurdson says it can’t be tolerated.

“It’s not acceptable in this day and time, with the taxes we pay, that we should have this kind of water. Mayor (Wayne) Baldwin says it’s safe to drink – I went out and bought bottled water for my dog to drink. I wouldn’t give anyone (this) water.”

Ironically, Sigurdson said, the same morning he received a letter from the city advising residents that the water system will be flushed between June 12 and 16.

“If this is before flushing, what’s going to happen when they start flushing?”

He said that after leaving taps running and frequently flushing toilets, the problem disappeared – for now – but that he’s also concerned sediment from the water can get caught in fridge filters, toilet reservoirs and water heating systems.

“Who pays for that stuff if it needs to be replaced? I’m sure the city isn’t going to pay for that,” he said.

“And we’re healthy people – but what if you have a compromised immune system?

“Making our water clear from an aesthetic standpoint is only part of it – we have major issues, including aging infrastructure, and the arsenic and manganese, and the issue of chlorination and chloramination and the hazards of that. The story goes on and on.

“I’ve been trying to formulate an email to the city that isn’t angry, or long and rambling – I usually have a 24-hour rule about that.”

Just Posted

Homelessness group puts pressure on White Rock council

Peninsula Homeless to Housing task force brought forward three action steps for council

Stabbing at Surrey banquet hall sends man to hospital

RCMP says victim has ‘non-life threatening’ injuries, incident still under investigation

Slam poetry creates catharsis for North Delta youth

Burnsview Secondary team gearing up for poetry festival and competition in April

South Surrey parking ticket perplexes, frustrates

Theresa Delaney predicts more people will be wrongly ticketed

‘Just like Iron Man’: Calgary surgeon undergoes experimental spinal surgery

Dr. Richi Gill was in a freak accident on a boogie board during a family vacation in Hawaii

Sex abuse survivors to meet with Vatican summit organizers

Pope Francis has urged participants to meet with abuse victims before they came to Rome

Ex-FBI official: ‘Crime may have been committed’ by Trump

Andrew McCabe said FBI had good reason to open a counterintelligence investigation into whether Trump was in league with Russia

B.C. athlete takes home gold in freestyle aerials at Canada Games

Brayden Kuroda won the event with a combined score of 121.65.

Pedestrian in serious condition after hit by car downtown Abbotsford

A youth was also hit, suffered minor injuries, police say

Cabinet likely to extend deadline to reconsider Trans Mountain pipeline

New round of consultations with Indigenous communities is coming

B.C. government provides $75,000 towards salmon study

Study looks at abundance and health of Pacific salmon in Gulf of Alaska

Murdered and missing honoured at Stolen Sisters Memorial March in B.C.

‘We come together to make change within the systems in our society’

Most Read

l -->