President Donald Trump speaks with reporters on the South Lawn of the White House Tuesday, Dec. 10, 2019, in Washington, before departing for a campaign rally in Hershey, Pa. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

President Donald Trump speaks with reporters on the South Lawn of the White House Tuesday, Dec. 10, 2019, in Washington, before departing for a campaign rally in Hershey, Pa. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

House gets two Trump impeachment charges after Judiciary vote

Vote in the House panel was split along party lines, with 23 Democrats voting in favor, 17 Republicans opposed

Impeachment charges against President Donald Trump went to the full House on Friday, following approval by the House Judiciary Committee.

The House is expected to take up the two articles of impeachment next week.

The abuse of power charge stems from Trump’s July phone call with the Ukraine president pressuring him to announce an investigation of Democrats as he was withholding US aid. The obstruction charge involves Trump’s blocking of House efforts to investigate his actions. Trump has denied wrongdoing.

The vote in the House panel was split along party lines, with 23 Democrats voting in favor and 17 Republicans opposed.

Trump is accused, in the first article, of abusing his presidential power by asking Ukraine to investigate his 2020 rival Joe Biden while holding military aid as leverage, and, in the second, of obstructing Congress by blocking the House’s efforts to probe his actions.

Voting came quickly after two days of hearings at the Capitol and a rancorous 14-hour session that was abruptly shut down late Thursday when the Democratic majority refused to be forced, after a long and bitter slog through failed Republican amendments aimed at killing the impeachment charges, into midnight voting. Instead, the impeachment charges against Trump were aired in full view of Americans.

Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., who had said he wanted lawmakers to “search their consciences” before casting their votes, gaveled in the landmark morning session.

Trump took to Twitter early Friday to praise the panel’s Republicans, saying “they were fantastic yesterday.”

“The Dems have no case at all, but the unity & sheer brilliance of these Republican warriors, all of them, was a beautiful sight to see,” he tweeted. “Dems had no answers and wanted out!”

ALSO READ: Here’s what you can expect from the Trump impeachment hearings

Associated Press writers Laurie Kellman, Alan Fram, and Padmananda Rama contributed to this report.

The Associated Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

This week, in advance of the Canadian Junior Hockey League trade deadline, the Surrey Eagles traded the playing right to Cade Alami to the Prince George Spruce Kings. Alami left the BCHL last month to play in the United States. (Damon James photo)
Surrey Eagles add, subtract from roster as junior-hockey trade deadline passes

With BC Hockey League season still up in air, team makes flurry of moves

Image Surrey.ca
Surrey council resurrects, fast tracks 84th Avenue connection at Bear Creek Park

The city put the brakes on this project in 2007 because of community opposition

Brady
‘Don’t give up’: Surrey man touts RAAC clinic for opioid addiction

Fraser Health has opened a second Rapid Access to Addiction Care clinic in the region

Multiple firearms were among items seized by Surrey RCMP from a Whalley condo this week. (Surrey RCMP photo)
Firearms, drugs among items seized by police from Whalley condo

Investigation began after report of vehicle robbery with use of firearm, RCMP say

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry updates B.C.’s COVID-19 situation at the B.C. legislature. (B.C. government)
B.C. reports 10 additional deaths, 395 new COVID-19 cases

The majority of new coronavirus infections were in the Fraser Health region

Site C will go ahead, one year later and $5.3 billion more, the NDP announced Feb 26. (BC Hydro image)
B.C. NDP announces Site C will go ahead with new $16B budget

Reviews recommend more oversight, beefed up foundation stability work

The last three wild northern spotted owls live near the Spuzzum Watershed outside of Hope. The province recently ordered a halt to logging for at least a year to give the owls a chance to survive.  (Photo/Jared Hobbs)
Logging halted in northern spotted owl habitat near Hope

Halt will last at least a year, gives time to formulate survival plan for Northern Spotted Owl

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

Several BC Ferries sailings are cancelled Friday morning due to adverse weather. (Black Press Media File)
Tsawwassen to Swartz Bay ferry sailing cancelled due to high winds, sea state

Adverse weather causes cancellations across several BC Ferries routes

The BC Prosecution Service announced last year that it was appointing lawyer Marilyn Sandford as a special prosecutor to review the case, following media inquiries about disclosure issues linked to a pathologist involved in the matter. (Black Press Media files)
Possible miscarriage of justice in B.C. woman’s conviction in toddler drowning: prosecutor

Tammy Bouvette was originally charged with second-degree murder but pleaded guilty in 2013 to the lesser charge

A kid in elementary school wearing a face mask amid the COVID-19 pandemic. (Metro Creative)
Union asks why an elementary school mask rule wouldn’t work in B.C. if it does elsewhere

B.C. education minister announced expansion of mask-wearing rules in middle, high school but not elementary students

A pharmacist prepares a COVID-19 vaccine at Village Green Retirement Campus in Federal Way on Jan. 26. (Olivia Sullivan/Sound Publishing)
Canada approves use of AstraZeneca’s COVID-19 vaccine

The country joins more than a dozen others in giving the shot the green light

A new survey has found that virtual visits are British Columbian’s preferred way to see the doctor amid the COVID-19 pandemic. (Unsplash)
Majority of British Columbians now prefer routine virtual doctor’s visits: study

More than 82% feel virtual health options reduce wait times, 64% think they lead to better health

Most Read