Traffic, particularly on South Surrey’s 24 Avenue, has been a point of contention for letter writers in the past. (Aaron Hinks photo)

Traffic, particularly on South Surrey’s 24 Avenue, has been a point of contention for letter writers in the past. (Aaron Hinks photo)

KPU to host forums on transit, mobility in Surrey

Events to include panel, question-and-answer discussions

As Surrey continues to be the region’s fastest-growing community, Kwantlen Polytechnic University is hosting two geo-forums to highlight mobility and transit issues.

On Feb. 27 and March 19 (both Thursdays), from 7 to 9 p.m., KPU will host the Mobilities 2020 Geo-Forums at the Civic Plaza campus (13485 Central Ave.). The events will include a panel and question-and-answer discussions with city public transportation officials, urban planners, scholars, and activists for transit, universal access, cycling and pedestrians.

Both evenings are free, but registration is required. To register, visit kpu.ca/arts/geography/news.

The two forums on public transportation, pedestrian and mobility issues will focus on “key mobility challenges and debates, including improving the transit network; rail proposals; universal access for disenabled residents, pedestrians, cyclists and elders; transit justice and other transportation issues.”

According to a release from KPU, Surrey’s population has grown 2.9 per cent, or more than 16,500 people from 2018 to 2019, “and will continue to grow to become the largest city in B.C. in the coming years.”

David Sadoway, a KPU geography instructor and organizer of the event, said that “mobility and livability issues will continue to be one of critical importance to our quality of life,” as the region continues to grow.

“So really we want to talk about movement and non-vehicular mobility in all its forms – from transit to walking, cycling, or taking a wheelchair – in the diverse places we live, work and play, both today and into the future,” Sadoway said.

He said that with a growing population “there are always challenges with congestion, road safety, air and noise pollution, as well as Surrey’s reputation with urban sprawl, suburbia and an auto-oriented landscape.”

“Entrenched car culture cannot be tackled with a few silver bullet steps, but instead requires integrated, comprehensive approaches.”

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lauren.collins@surreynowleader.com

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