Man accused of bilking U.S. seniors faces deportation

William Dixon worked as salesman for fraudulent Surrey telemarketing company.

Man accused of bilking U.S. seniors faces deportation

A man accused of bilking millions of dollars from American seniors through a telemarketing scam has been ordered deported to the U.S. to face charges.

It’s alleged William Dixon worked for a company based in Surrey that collected about $3 million from seniors by giving them false hope about their prospects of winning the lottery. According to court documents, the victims were induced into sending money to International Brokers Limited (IBL) on the basis they had a good chance of winning.

Dixon is said to have been the company’s most successful salesman. The elderly victims received no money in return.

A B.C. Supreme Court judge ordered in June 2009 that Dixon be extradited to the U.S., and in April 2010 the Minister of Justice ordered him to be surrendered.

Dixon, according to a B.C. Appeal Court judgment made public this week, admitted he acted inappropriately.

“The evidence supports and Mr. Dixon in fact concedes that he made false statements to victims that caused them to send money to IBL,” reads the judgment. “IBL was an entirely fraudulent operation based on the evidence of former employees who described its activities. Mr. Dixon worked in a team as a closer. He was the most successful sales person.”

However, Dixon requested a judicial review of his extradition, claiming his rights to a fair trial would be hindered in the U.S. He also argued that his deportation would be a hardship on his family, who live in Canada.

Three B.C. Appeal Court justices dismissed Dixon’s appeal in a judgement posted online Tuesday (http://bit.ly/m4paUr). His extradition process will now proceed.