North Delta pipe-fitters’, plumbers’ union to get $600K in funding

The union will spend the federal money on new equipment for its training facility on Annacis Island

Instructor Will Schwarz stands front of the band saw at the UA Local 170 training facility. The band saw is one of the pieces of equipment that will be replaced with the new federal funding. (Grace Kennedy photo)

Delta’s local trades school will be able to get more equipment for its plumbing, sprinkler-fitting, welding and steamfitting students, thanks to $600,000 in federal funding.

Delta MP Carla Qualtrough announced the funding at the UA Local 170 training facility on Annacis Island on April 4.

“I’m very proud that we have this kind of facility in Delta,” Qualtrough said. “I talk about Delta being the engine of the Lower Mainland in many ways, having both Tilbury and Annacis Island. People don’t appreciate the amount of work that is done in our community, and it’s very exciting to be able to highlight that.”

According to union business manager Al Phillips, this is three times more than other UA Locals received from the government.

“That’s because we have a long history of doing this type of work,” he explained. “We’re well established with the federal government, they know who we are, they can go back and see our successes and stats.”

The funding, which came from the Union Training and Innovation Program, will go to support the purchase of several new pieces of large equipment, such as welding machines, a band saw, a new plasma machine and an iron worker, as well as new tools for the students. According to instructor Will Schwarz, each class needs a set of 18 tools and with more than 500 students going through the school each year, they get worn down easily.

The funding will also help support the school’s different labs, which give students a first hand look at the different types of pipes, boilers and sprinkler systems they could be working with in the field.

“It’s important for any learner to have new equipment to learn on,” said Barry Donaldson, executive director of the training facility. “This will help them learn on the latest equipment.”



grace.kennedy@northdeltareporter.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

 

A UA Local 170 student walks over to the iron worker, a machine that the facility hopes to replace with the new federal funding. (Grace Kennedy photo)

Just Posted

White Rock Renegades ‘04 named national champs

Girls went undefeated at national tournament in Calgary

PHOTOS: Supercars parade to White Rock

More than a dozen cars were on display for the Drive Project

South Surrey woman promotes exercise to help fight Parkinson’s disease

‘This keeps me strong’ says Liz Holroyd Campbell, organizer of the 2019 Parkinson Superwalk

QUIZ: How much do you remember about Woodstock?

Weekend music festival in Bethel, New York, was held 50 years ago

Advocates ‘internationalize’ the fight to free Raif Badawi from Saudi prison

Raif Badawi was arrested on June 17, 2012, and was later sentenced to 1,000 lashes and 10 years in jail for his online criticism of Saudi clerics

Canadian entrepreneurs turning beer byproduct into bread, cookies and profits

Some breweries turn to entrepreneurs looking to turn spent grain into treats for people and their pets

Canada ‘disappointed’ terror suspect’s British citizenship revoked

Jack Letts, who was dubbed “Jihadi Jack” by the U.K. media, has been detained in a Kurdish prison for about two years

Chrystia Freeland condemns violence in Hong Kong, backs right to peaceful assembly

There have been months of protests in the semi-autonomous region

B.C. VIEWS: Log exports and my other errors so far in 2019

Plastic bags, legislature overspending turn out differently

Most Read

l -->