‘Paper bag rapist’ to get another chance at parole

John Horace Oughton may not be treatable, but the man known as the paper bag rapist is still entitled to a parole review.

John Horace Oughton may not be treatable, but the man known as the paper bag rapist is still entitled to a parole review.

Oughton was declared a dangerous offender in 1986 after he admitted to sexually assaulting more than 140 women and children during a 10-year rampage that included Burnaby, Langley and other Metro Vancouver communities.

Prison spokesperson Kelsey Hymander confirmed Oughton will get a review sometime in mid-September once officials at Mountain Institution in Agassiz have completed an assessment and filed their report with the National Parole Board.

The 61-year-old former hot tub salesman was nicknamed the “paper bag rapist” for his habit of placing coverings over his face or the faces of his victims.

Two were from Langley.

In April, 1985, the 11-year-old friends were taking a short cut through the Langley Civic Centre grounds at 42 Avenue and 208 Street when they were lured into tall grass by Oughton.

Under Canadian law, a person declared a dangerous offender is jailed with no release date but is entitled to a review of parole eligibility every two years.

A previous parole assessment found Oughton was essentially untreatable.

“Your dangerous maladaptive personality structure is so entrenched and widespread that you are unsuitable for any currently available psychiatric treatment” the parole board report stated.

“No intervention exists to reduce your very high risk to reoffend.”

Oughton hasn’t participated in his parole hearings since his disastrous appearance in 2003 when he was wrestled to the ground and handcuffed.

The hearing before three National Parole Board members bogged down over Oughton’s complaint that he had been given insufficient notice of the hearing.

The board briefly adjourned the hearing and when it resumed, informed Oughton that it would proceed.

There are strict rules governing the behavior of prisoners at hearings, and Oughton broke one of them when he stood up and turned towards the small gallery where five of his victims were seated.

It appeared that he was trying to make for the exit which would have brought him within feet of his victims.

When a guard moved to stop him, Oughton, who was not shackled or handcuffed, became belligerent.

It took the guard, a parole officer and a Langley RCMP officer to subdue him.

Oughton was handcuffed and escorted out of the room.

The hearing resumed without Oughton present and his parole was denied.

At the time, the father of one of the Langley victims said Oughton’s right to a regular hearing subjects his whole family to more anxiety and inconvenience.

His daughter will bear the scars of her ordeal forever, he said.

“It never goes away. It’s an ugly chapter in our life, and we just have to deal with it,” he said.

In 1999, when he was still trying to convince authorities he’d reformed, Oughton registered a book he’d written with the  National Library of Canada titled “Mountain thoughts: an inmate’s journey towards self-knowledge.”

It does not appear to have been published.

Just Posted

VIDEO: Young balance-bikers race through Surrey’s Civic Plaza at Strider Cup

The course has several obstacles including ‘Mount Scary’ and the ‘Noodle Monster’

White Rock Beer For The Pier to go on sale early this week

Restaurants, bars and liquor stores from Vancouver to Chilliwack will sell new brew

45-year-old ID’ed as victim of South Surrey stabbing

Delphin Paul Prestbakmo died at the scene, near 18 Avenue and 152 Street

‘Potentially life-threatening’ injuries in overnight Surrey crash

Police had Highway 10 between 180th and 186th streets closed for several hours

Support granted for NatureKids

Program provides opportunities for youth and families to learn about and enjoy the outdoors

QUIZ: How much do you remember about Woodstock?

Weekend music festival in Bethel, New York, was held 50 years ago

‘It’s just the freedom:’ Paralyzed Broncos player pursuing life on the water

The former Humboldt Broncos goaltender, who started in the net when he was nine, was paralyzed last year

Canadians killed in Afghanistan honoured during emotional dedication ceremony

One-hundred-fifty-eight Canadian soldiers died during the mission

It’s snow joke: Up to 30 cm of snow expected to fall in northeastern B.C.

Alaska Highway, Fort Nelson to be hit with August snowstorm, according to Environment Canada

‘I’m just absolutely disgusted’: Husband furious after B.C. Mountie’s killer gets day parole

Kenneth Fenton was sentenced to prison after he fatally struck Const. Sarah Beckett’s cruiser

Sea-to-Sky Gondola in B.C. likely out of commission until 2020

Sea to Sky Gondola carries between 1,500 and 3,000 people every day during the summer season

PHOTOS: Weapons seized at Portland right-wing rally, counterprotests

Not all who gathered Saturday were with right-wing groups or antifa

Maple Ridge’s first retail cannabis store opens Monday

Spiritleaf is just the second private pot shop in the Fraser Valley

Discussion on grief and loss between Stephen Colbert, Anderson Cooper goes viral

The exchange includes emotional question from Cooper, and outlook on grief as a child

Most Read

l -->