Conservative leader Andrew Scheer rises during Question Period in the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Monday, June 3, 2019. Federal Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer says there is no place in society for comments such as the ones U.S. President Donald Trump has made about four Democratic congresswomen. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

Scheer on Trump: It’s ‘offensive’ to question the family background of critics

Trump is being called a racist for saying that the four congresswomen should go back where they came from

Federal Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer says there is no place in society for comments such as the ones U.S. President Donald Trump has made about four Democratic congresswomen.

Scheer said he believes people should be free to criticize their governments without having their backgrounds questioned or being told to leave the country.

“I don’t think there’s any place in our society for intolerance or … those kinds of divisive comments,” Scheer said Wednesday when asked by reporters in Saskatoon where he was speaking to the Chamber of Commerce.

“People should be able to advocate for their views. They should be able to criticize their government. They should be able to advocate for their own ideas without having their background or their personal identity or where their family might come from questioned or in any way taken into account.”

Trump is being called a racist for suggesting on Twitter that the four congresswomen should go back where they came from if they don’t like America.

Trump’s targets were Democrats Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York, Ayanna Pressley of Massachusetts, Ilhan Omar of Minnesota and Rashida Tlaib of Michigan.

All are American and all but Omar were born in the United States. They’ve been among the party’s most outspoken advocates for impeachment.

Scheer didn’t go so far as calling the tweets racist, but said they were offensive.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has said Trump’s comments would not fly north of the border because diversity is one of Canada’s strengths.

“That is not how we do things in Canada,” Trudeau said earlier in the week.

“A Canadian is a Canadian is a Canadian, and the diversity of our country is actually one of our greatest strengths and a source of tremendous resilience and pride for Canadians and we will continue to defend that.”

READ MORE: Diversity a Canadian strength, Trudeau says of Trump tweets at congresswomen

READ MORE: Go back to your ‘broken and crime infested’ homes, Trump tells congresswomen of colour

— With files from The Associated Press

The Canadian Press


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

White Rock Renegades ‘04 named national champs

Girls went undefeated at national tournament in Calgary

PHOTOS: Supercars parade to White Rock

More than a dozen cars were on display for the Drive Project

South Surrey woman promotes exercise to help fight Parkinson’s disease

‘This keeps me strong’ says Liz Holroyd Campbell, organizer of the 2019 Parkinson Superwalk

QUIZ: How much do you remember about Woodstock?

Weekend music festival in Bethel, New York, was held 50 years ago

Advocates ‘internationalize’ the fight to free Raif Badawi from Saudi prison

Raif Badawi was arrested on June 17, 2012, and was later sentenced to 1,000 lashes and 10 years in jail for his online criticism of Saudi clerics

Canadian entrepreneurs turning beer byproduct into bread, cookies and profits

Some breweries turn to entrepreneurs looking to turn spent grain into treats for people and their pets

Canada ‘disappointed’ terror suspect’s British citizenship revoked

Jack Letts, who was dubbed “Jihadi Jack” by the U.K. media, has been detained in a Kurdish prison for about two years

Chrystia Freeland condemns violence in Hong Kong, backs right to peaceful assembly

There have been months of protests in the semi-autonomous region

B.C. VIEWS: Log exports and my other errors so far in 2019

Plastic bags, legislature overspending turn out differently

Most Read

l -->