File photo of Surrey firefighters working to free a driver after a car crash in Surrey.

File photo of Surrey firefighters working to free a driver after a car crash in Surrey.

Surrey looking into reducing speed limits on residential streets

City council has approved a year-long pilot project that will see limits reduced to 40 km/h on three streets and 30 km/h on three others

The City of Surrey is toying with the idea of reducing speed limits on residential streets after council on Monday unanimously gave the green light to a pilot project that will see speed limits reduced from 50 km/h to 40 km/h in three residential areas – and to 30 km/h in three others – for one year.

“The pilot project has been carefully designed to test the impacts of reduced speed limits such that staff can make informed recommendations with regards to residential area speed limits city-wide,” Scott Neuman, Surrey’s general manager of engineering, told council in a corporate report.

All told, eight stretches of road are included in the study, but two of them will be control sites and keep the present posted limited of 50 km/h.

They are between 96 Avenue and 100 Avenue from 124 Street and 128 Street, between 75 Avenue and 80 Avenue from 120A Street and 124 Street, between Rosemary Heights Crescent and 40 Avenue from 153 Street and 156B Street, between 56 Avenue and 60 Avenue from 180 Street and 184 Street, between 60 Avenue and 64 Avenue from 132 Street and 136 Street, between 88 Avenue and 92 Avenue from King George Boulevard and 140 Street, between 104 Avenue and 108 Avenue from 128 Street and 132 Street, and between 100 Avenue and 104 Avenue from 140 Street and 144 Street.

This is part of the Vision Zero Safe Surrey Mobility Plan for 2019 to 2023, that was launched in February 2019 with the aim of no people being killed or injured on Surrey’s streets.

READ ALSO: Surrey mayor says Vision Zero Surrey did ‘tremendous’ work in 2019 to make roads safer

READ ALSO: Surrey looking into reducing residential speed limits

Councillor Doug Elford, who lives on a residential road that parallels a busy thoroughfare, says he knows all about “rat-running, which is speeding through the subdivisions to avoid intersections.

“I also happen to live in a school zone which over the years I’ve witnessed some very serious close calls. So the statistics say that when you get hit by a vehicle at 30 versus 50 it’s quite exponential in terms of survival,” he noted, voicing his support for the pilot project.

Mayor Doug McCallum said he’s “really looking forward” to seeing the pilot project get underway.

“I happen to live in a community that does have 20 miles an hour through it and I can tell you it really works well in Crescent Beach where the speed limit for the whole community is down at 20, or it’s at 30, sorry, and it really does slow traffic people are a lot more aware of it,” McCallum said. “I’m looking forward to this pilot program I think it hopefully will be very successful and I think it’s a start of us, if we combine that with our traffic cameras and traffic control on our roads, we’re starting to get a grip on managing our traffic and making it especially safety throughout Surrey.”

Neuman noted in his report that according to the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials Highway Safety Manual a 2 km/h speed reduction can result in a 17 per cent decrease in fatal collisions. “It is also widely accepted that a pedestrian struck at 50 km/h has just a 15 percent chance of survival, while a pedestrian struck at 30 km/h has a 90 percent chance of survival,” Neuman wrote.

Neuman also noted Toronto reduced the posted speed limit from 40 km/h to 30 km/h on all local roads in 12 municipal wards resulting in a 28 per cent drop in pedestrian-related crashes.

“Notably, these results were achieved solely with changes to the posted speed limit, and without the implementation of traffic calming or other supporting infrastructure,” he told council.

Moreover, Edmonton lowered the speed limits from 50 km/h to 30 km/h in school zones resulting in a 45 per cent reduction in fatal crashes and injuries.



tom.zytaruk@surreynowleader.com

Like us on Facebook and follow Tom on Twitter

car crashCity of SurreyTraffic

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Through his lens, Doug Cook captured this picture of the Fraser River, Mount Baker, an eagle, and even the Golden Ears Bridge on a sunny fall afternoon. The photo was taken from the wooden walkway leading down to the Pitt Meadows Regional Airport float plane dock. (Contributed photo)
Friends of Semiahmoo Bay to host virtual World Wetland Day event

Webinar event to feature six speakers, to be held Feb. 2

One of the Choices Lottery grand prize packages includes a home located at 16730 19 Ave., Surrey. (Contributed photo)
Two South Surrey homes featured in Choices Lottery

Tickets on sale now for BC Children’s Hospital lottery

Sources team members (left to right) Carrie Belanger, Abby Gemino, Tatiana Belyaeva, Yasmin de Joya-Pagal cheer during the 2020 Coldest Night of the Year event. This year’s event will be virtual due to the COVID-19 pandemic. (Sources photo)
White Rock’s Coldest Night of the Year fundraiser goes virtual

Annual walk raises funds for variety of Sources programs and services

An Amica White Rock resident receives the COVID-19 vaccine during a Jan. 15, 2021 clinic. (Tracy Holmes photo)
PHOTOS: South Surrey seniors grateful for ‘freedom’ of COVID-19 vaccine

Vaccination clinics at Fraser Health long-term and assisted-living sites were to wrap up Jan. 15

Fraser Health has declared a COVID-19 outbreak at a Surrey high-intensity rehabilitation unit, Laurel Place. On Dec. 22, 2020, Fraser Health said four patients and two staff members have tested positive for the virus. (Image: Google Street View)
Fraser Health says COVID-19 outbreak over at Laurel Place in Surrey

Health authority declared outbreak over Jan. 16

An animated Gordie Hogg introduces his 'Community Connections' videos. (YouTube screenshot)
Community Connections: Gordie Hogg speaks with Scott Ackles

Former mayor, MP began posting conversations on YouTube in June

Williams Lake physician Dr. Ivan Scrooby and medical graduate student Vionarica Gusti hold up the COSMIC Bubble Helmet. Both are part of the non-profit organization COSMIC Medical which has come together to develop devices for treating patients with COVID-19. (Monica Lamb-Yorski photo - Williams Lake Tribune)
Group of B.C. doctors, engineers developing ‘bubble helmet’ for COVID-19 patients

The helmet could support several patients at once, says the group

A 17-year-old snowmobiler used his backcountry survival sense in preparation to spend the night on the mountain near 100 Mile House Saturday, Jan. 16, 2021 after getting lost. (South Cariboo Search and Rescue Facebook photo)
Teen praised for backcountry survival skills after getting lost in B.C.’s Cariboo mountains

“This young man did everything right after things went wrong.”

Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole holds a press conference on Parliament Hill, in Ottawa on December 10, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
No place for ‘far right’ in Conservative Party, Erin O’Toole says

O’Toole condemned the Capitol attack as ‘horrifying’ and sought to distance himself and the Tories from Trumpism

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

A passer by walks in High Park, in Toronto, Thursday, Jan. 14, 2021. This workweek will kick off with what’s fabled to be the most depressing day of the year, during one of the darkest eras in recent history. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young
‘Blue Monday’ getting you down? Exercise may be the cure, say experts

Many jurisdictions are tightening restrictions to curb soaring COVID-19 case counts

A health-care worker prepares a dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine at a UHN COVID-19 vaccine clinic in Toronto on Thursday, January 7, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
COVID-19: Provinces work on revised plans as Pfizer-BioNTech shipments to slow down

Anita Anand said she understands and shares Canadians’ concerns about the drug company’s decision

Tourists take photographs outside the British Columbia Legislature in Victoria, B.C., on Friday August 26, 2011. A coalition of British Columbia tourism industry groups is urging the provincial government to not pursue plans to ban domestic travel to fight the spread of COVID-19. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
B.C. travel ban will harm struggling tourism sector, says industry coalition

B.C. government would have to show evidence a travel ban is necessary

(Phil McLachlan - Capital News)
‘Targeted’ shooting in Coquitlam leaves woman in hospital

The woman suffered non-life threatening injuries in what police believe to be a targeted shooting Saturday morning

Most Read