West-facing view of Nicomekl River towards where its mouth meets Mud Bay in Surrey. (Photo: Wikipedia)

Surrey receives $624K for climate change projects

Funding from feds will support Surrey’s coastal flood plans and low-carbon energy research

Surrey has received $624,000 for several new climate change projects.

The grants will support four different projects, three of which are to advance Surrey’s Coastal Flood Adaption Strategy (CFAS).

The projects are supported by the Federation of Canadian Municipalities’ Municipalities for Climate Innovation Program, funded by federal government.

“Communities like the City of Surrey are looking for ways to maximize their infrastructure dollars, plan for, and adapt to the impacts of climate change, and undertake programs that benefit the environment,” said Jenny Gerbasi, President of the Canadian Federation of Municipalities, in a release. “Local solutions are helping tackle national challenges — and are building a more livable, competitive Canada. We are proud of the great work communities are undertaking with the help of these programs.”

A total of $175,000 will go toward the development of the city’s CFAS, aimed at increasing resiliency to flooding and sea level rise.

See also: Growing risk of devastating flood in Lower Mainland from climate change: report

Another $102,800 will further support the CFAS with the Improving Coastal Flood Adaptation Approaches to Minimize Infrastructure Risk by “engaging various levels of government on the significant critical infrastructure vulnerabilities on land posed by coastal flooding and sea level rise.”

A third CFAS-connected project, to prioritize infrastructure and ecosystem risk from coastal processes in Mud Bay, is receiving $171,400. This initiative aims to increase awareness of coastal infrastructure.

The city also plans to consult with environmental organizations, research and analysis of important ecosystems and species along Surrey’s Coast, in Mud Bay.

“The area is recognized as an internationally important bird area, providing critical nutrients to birds on the Pacific Fly Way,” notes a city release. “The project brings together technical specialists in coastal geomorphology, marine species and migratory birds to assess shoreline vulnerabilities and strengthens relationships with environmental organizations such as Duck Unlimited Canada and Friends of Semiahmoo Bay Society.”

Meantime, Surrey’s district energy system is receiving $175,000 for research in low-carbon energy supply alternatives.

See also: VIDEO: Surrey breaks ground at West Village Energy Centre and Park

According to a release, the project will look at pre-design materials to find the most cost-effective options, including the use of biomass from clean urban waste wood at the Green Timbers site and the use of waste heat from the South Surrey Interceptor trunk sewer in combination with waste heat from refrigeration at the new arena facility at the Trouten Pit site.

“The City of Surrey is leading the way in planning for the challenges presented by a changing climate,” said Mayor Linda Hepner in a release. “As a coastal community, it is important that we bring together our partners and stakeholders to develop solutions to the impact of climate change.”

Surrey Centre MP Randeep Sarai said these new programs will help Surrey “maintain their infrastructure more strategically, and will enable them to invest in infrastructure projects reducing greenhouse gas emissions and better preparing for the impacts of climate change.

He added: “Innovative green infrastructure projects contribute to a clean growth economy and strengthen the middle class by ensuring communities are healthy and sustainable places to live.”



amy.reid@surreynowleader.com

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