Chief Superintendent Brian Edwards is the Surrey RCMP’s new officer in charge. (Photo: City of Surrey)

Surrey’s new top cop is White Rock resident Brian Edwards

A transition plan will see Edwards start in his new job on Jan. 6

Chief Superintendent Brian Edwards has been selected as the new Officer in Charge of the Surrey RCMP detachment, the City of Surrey announced Wednesday afternoon (Dec. 11).

A transition plan will see Edwards start in his new job on Jan. 6, 2020. He will be promoted to the rank of Assistant Commissioner upon assuming his new role, according to a news release.

“I welcome (Edwards) in his new role as Officer in Charge of Surrey RCMP,” Mayor Doug McCallum said in the release.

“In his policing career spanning 24 years, (Edwards) has served with both RCMP and municipal police departments. His extensive experience in strategic and business planning will be an asset as Surrey transitions from the RCMP to a municipal police department.”

McCallum is leading a charge to replace the RCMP in Surrey with a city police force.

• RELATED STORY: Oppal says Surrey mayor wrong about policing transition timeline.

According to a bio, Edwards started as a volunteer Auxiliary Constable with Okotoks RCMP before joining the Calgary Police Service in 1995. Since 2003, he has worked with the RCMP in the Lower Mainland, serving in Richmond, the Lower Mainland District and at the provincial level.

Edwards has a law degree and a Masters in Linguistics from the University of Calgary. He lives in White Rock with his family.

In October, Surrey RCMP’s current boss Dwayne McDonald announced he would move on to a new role as the RCMP’s criminal operations officer in charge of federal, investigative services and organized crime for B.C. At the time, McDonald said he would continue to be Officer in Charge of Surrey RCMP until a replacement is chosen.

On Wednesday, Assistant Commissioner Stephen Thatcher, district commander, said Edwards is the right fit for the Surrey detachment, with his “collaborative approach and ability to set and implement a strategic vision.”

“I have every confidence that he will continue the excellent work of outgoing Detachment Commander, Assistant Commissioner Dwayne McDonald, ensuring public safety and employee wellness,” Thatcher stated.

“I am looking forward to working with a team of remarkable and progressive staff members, and carrying on the work of Assistant Commissioner Dwayne McDonald,” Edwards said in the release.

“The safety of Surrey’s citizens and the health and wellness of detachment employees will be paramount as I take on this challenging and exciting new role. I welcome the opportunity to serve the citizens of Surrey and Mayor and Council as we enter the new year.”

• READ ALSO: Former councillor helping organize ‘Speak Up Surrey’ rally against budget.

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