White Rock Couns. Grant Meyer, Helen Fathers and Bill Lawrence say they’re not ruling out running for mayor in October’s civic elections.

Three White Rock councillors mull runs for mayor

Two other incumbents confirm runs to return to council

In the wake of White Rock Mayor Wayne Baldwin’s announcement that he will not run for re-election at the civic polls in October, three incumbent councillors say they haven’t ruled out a bid for the mayor’s seat.

Couns. Grant Meyer, Helen Fathers and Bill Lawrence said a mayoral run is possible.

Meyer confirmed to Peace Arch News that he is giving the idea serious thought.

“I’m definitely going to be running again, and there is a distinct chance I could run for mayor,” he said. “Ever since (Baldwin’s announcement) the phone has been ringing and lots of people have been asking me to take the leap to the mayor’s seat. Lots of people have been phoning me up and telling me they support me.

“I’m definitely going to consider it. I’ll be out talking to people over the next few months.”

Coun. Helen Fathers confirmed that running for mayor “is a possibility” for her, adding that public concern over increasing development in the city under the White Rock Coalition majority has become an issue.

“I do agree that a change is needed,” said Fathers, who was one of two councillors elected without slate affiliation. “I just haven’t made my mind up yet, whether it’s to run for a council seat or the mayor’s seat.”

Coun. Bill Lawrence said that while he does plan on running again, he hasn’t so far considered a run at mayor – although he didn’t rule out the possibility entirely.

“I haven’t put any brain waves on that, as yet – it does provide an interesting note (to this year’s race),” he said.

Coun. Megan Knight was succinct on her plans for the election.

“Yes, I’m going to be running for council, but no I wouldn’t be running for mayor,” she said.

Coun. Lynne Sinclair said she is definitely running for office again – but as a councillor only.

“I really enjoy working on the projects I’m working on currently, like working on arts and culture and the health and social welfare of the community,” she said.

“I think there are other people who are interested in running for mayor. It should be an interesting race – it always is. I’m looking forward to discussions during the campaign and community input in that regard.”

Independent Coun. David Chesney, who has been outspoken over the pace of development in the city – particularly in the uptown and lower Johnston Road areas – said he is still considering whether to go to the polls again.

“I haven’t fully made my mind up yet,” he said. “If I were to run, it would be as a councillor – I have no interest at all in being mayor. But one of the few times I have agreed with the mayor is when he said (in his announcement) that it is time for a change.”

Just Posted

Fire destroys home in Surrey

Crews called at 3 a.m. Sunday for a residential house fire on the 12000-block of 100 Avenue

Art show to be held at White Rock’s Jan’s on the Beach

Art to be displayed until the end of December

New detox centre opens in South Surrey

WhiteRock EHN opened in response to opioid crisis

VIDEO: Surrey hair salon joins sustainability initiative

Hair can be used to create boom to clean up oil spills: Green Circle Salons

REPLAY: B.C’s best video this week

In case you missed it, here’s a look at the replay-worth highlights from this week across the province

Children between 6 and 9 eligible for $1,200 RESP grant from province

BC Ministry of Education is reminding residents to apply before the deadline

Victoria spent $30,000 to remove John A. Macdonald statue

Contentious decision sparked controversy, apology from mayor

Privacy concerns over credit card use for legal online pot purchases

Worries follow privacy breaches at some Canadian cannabis retailers

Vancouver Police look for man in connection to ‘sexually motivated’ assault

Woman says man followed her into an apartment building

NEB approves operating pressure increase to repaired Enbridge pipeline

The pipeline burst outside of Prince George on Oct. 9, now operating at 85 per cent

B.C. VIEWS: Setting speed limits in a post-fact political environment

Media prefer ‘speed kills’ narrative, even when it fails to appear

Controversy erupts over Japanese flag in B.C. classroom

Online petition demanding removal has collected more than 5,700 signatures

Most Read

l -->