An application for a Heritage Revitalization Agreement concerning the historic H.C. Major House near South Surrey’s Crescent Park, received third reading at council Monday evening. (City of Surrey photo)

Unanimous support for three South Surrey proposals

Opposition received at public hearings

Surrey council gave unanimous support to a trio of South Surrey applications this week, giving third reading to projects in Ocean Park and Morgan Creek, as well as to a heritage revitalization agreement (HRA) for a site on Crescent Road.

The applications have yet to receive final reading. Council next meets Jan. 22.

Monday’s support followed public hearings during which only a handful of people stepped forward to voice opinions on the proposals.

No one spoke to the HRA – although council did receive one letter from a concerned neighbour – which was sought to facilitate construction of a new home on the same property as the historic H.C. Major House, near Crescent Park. The agreement also targets “restoration and long-term protection” of the 1922-built house, located at 12876 Crescent Rd.; the house is also proposed for renaming, to the Brynjolfson Residence, a reference to Icelander Sveinn Brynjolfson, who acquired the property in 1908.

According to a planning report, the unidentified neighbour who expressed concern about the application was worried the new home would “alter the Fengshui” of his or her own lot, and asked that a triangular shaped roof top not be pointed directly at the main door of the house and the main gate of the property.”

Council received 18 letters of opposition regarding the Morgan Creek application; a zoning amendment request to eliminate a proposed business centre in one of two previously approved buildings at 15436 31 Ave., and use the space for an additional three residential units.

Two people stepped forward to speak to the application. Deb Jack, president of Surrey Environmental Partners (SEP), said she was relieved to hear there would be no net riparian loss as a result of a request to reduce the minimum setback from the top of a Class A stream.

A resident of the first building told council that the application had majority support from those living in her 62-unit complex, “because we have a business centre in our first phase which is under-utilized.”

Regarding the Ocean Park application, to create a 12-home subdivision in the 2100-blocks of 128 and 128A streets, Mayor Linda Hepner said council received two letters opposing the application.

Two area residents who spoke cited concerns including the increase to density and traffic; as well, the potential impact to parking on 21 Avenue.

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