Facebook screengrab Facebook comment from the No more HighRises in White Rock account, which is run by City of White Rock Coun. Scott Kristjanson. The comments were later edited, removing the reference to ‘strong’ evidence along with other adjustments.

UPDATE: White Rock dog poop conspiracy picks up steam

Opponent says theory is a ‘load of crap’

There is a dog-poop theory making its rounds in the City of White Rock, and it appears to have picked up steam through a Facebook page run by a city councillor.

The allegation was raised Saturday by the Facebook page ‘No more HighRises in White Rock,’ which is conducted by City of White Rock Coun. Scott Kristjanson.

The comment was written after a number of photos of dog feces on or near the White Rock Promenade were posted on social media following a city council vote in favour of allowing dogs on the waterfront walkway, during the off-season, beginning this October.

“Sadly, there is strong evidence that the dog feces deposited in front of the Train Station last month was placed there by the NoDogs side, in an attempt to show how irresponsible dog owners are,” the No more HighRises in White Rock comment reads, which was written by Kristjanson, he confirmed.

“Happy to discuss details offline or after fines issued.”

The comment did not elaborate on the “strong evidence” offered, however, Kristjanson shared details of the evidence with Peace Arch News Wednesday after PAN published an online article about the Facebook comment.

Kristjanson said the shape of the poop was evidence that it was planted.

“The three samples that I noticed on the promenade near the museum were all cupped. As if someone had put them in bags and dropped them individually on the cement just to show a point,” Kristjanson said.

Kristjanson also said an earlier verision of PAN’s article about his Facebook comment “seemed a little inflammatory,” and he took issue with the term “conspiracy theory,” which was used in the story.

“I’m suggesting that there is one person who is responsible. A conspiracy would require at least two people,” Kristjanson said.

Kristjanson later edited his Facebook comment to say that the feces were placed there “possibly by someone on the NoDogs side.”

“That was just me being lazy in my post.

“It’s not like it was well-thought-out. I went and edited the post.”

Kristjanson told PAN the Facebook comment was “misunderstood and taken out of context.”

RELATED: Dogs allowed on White Rock Promenade during off-season

RELATED: White Rock bylaw increasing dog patrols on promenade

White Rock artist Ric Wallace, who has been vocal in his opposition to allowing dogs on the promenade, told PAN Tuesday that the theory that someone planted feces is “a load of crap.”

In an email sent to city councillors and PAN earlier this month, Wallace said that residents are willing to offer $100-$1,000 for videos of dog attacks on the White Rock waterfront.

The ‘No more HighRises in White Rock’ page made note of the offering.

“There is the case of people offering rewards for videos of kids being attacked by dogs on the Promenade. That borders on public endangerment by the NoDogs side, violating the very tenant (sic) they claimed to support,” Kristjanson’s comment reads.

The comment was later edited to exclude the word “kids.”

Kristjanson said he was surprised the dog issue has received as much public feedback as it has, and made reference to other projects the city is working on, including the official community plan review, the pier reconstruction, and financial budget.

“I just want to point out that I believe council is doing a very good job of listening to the people.

“I think passions are running way too high and that comes from people feeling like they’re not being heard. I just want to assure everybody that we are listening to both sides.”

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