City of White Rock workers put up fences around the promenade. The city announced this week that it would close the popular waterfront walkway ahead of the Easter long weekend. (Alex Browne photo)

White Rock’s promenade to close to the public

Public access to popular waterfront walkway closing April 10: city

The City of White Rock is closing its promenade, effective this Friday (April 10).

The measure is a proactive step to help reduce the spread of COVID-19, according to a news release issued Wednesday afternoon (April 8).

The move is in anticipation of groups on the beach and walkways as warm weather and long weekends approach, the release adds.

Crews began installing fencing Wednesday, city communications manager Donna Kell confirmed.

READ MORE: White Rock council votes to close pier to the public amid COVID-19 concerns

Kell said council last month gave Mayor Darryl Walker the authority to make the decision to close the promenade when he felt it was appropriate.

“Everyone loves our City by the Sea. The sandy shores, fish and chips and Canada’s Longest Pier are major attractions,” Walker said in the release.

“Right now, starting on Easter weekend, we are saying ‘This is not the time to visit.’

“We may be flattening the curve, as they say, but if we allow four days of fun and frivolity, where people get together and party and eat, it may set us back and we may need to stay apart even longer.

“Right now, the most important thing is battling COVID-19, and protecting our community’s health and our economy. Let’s fight COVID-19 by staying near our homes, maintaining a safe, physical distance, and reaching out to people through social media, Skype, Zoom or any other technology that brings us together.”

The closure follows last month’s closures of waterfront parking lots and the pier, and the reduction of parking on the north side of Marine Drive to a maximum of 15 minutes.



tholmes@peacearchnews.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

CoronavirusWhite Rock

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Local Chinese Canadians aim to counter COVID-19 backlash

Few racist incidents on Peninsula, says Community Engagement Society

Surrey to pay TransLink $30M in land, $9M in cash for work on cancelled LRT

Council considered staff report on city’s 2019 annual financial statements during Monday’s “virtual” council meeting

Surrey RCMP promise enforcement at unofficial show ‘n’ shines

Cars have been impounded at the site in the last two years

‘There’s no playbook for this’: South Surrey sports organizations await approval to return to play

Local associations planning for modified summer seasons as COVID-19 restrictions ease

Facing changes together: Your community, your journalists

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the world in ways that would have… Continue reading

B.C. retirement home creates innovative ‘meet-up’ unit for elderly to see family face-to-face

Innovative ‘purpose-built’ unit keeps residents safe when seeing family for first time since COVID-19

Fraser Valley libraries to offer contactless hold pick-ups

FVRL Express — Click, Pick, Go service to be offered at all 25 locations starting June 1

B.C.’s essential grocery, hardware store employees should get pandemic pay: retail group

Only B.C.’s social, health and corrections workers are eligible for top-ups

Edmonton, Vancouver and Toronto vying to be NHL hubs, but there’s a catch

The NHL unveiled a return-to-play plan that would feature 24 teams

B.C. sees 9 new COVID-19 cases, one death as officials watch for new cases amid Phase Two

Number of confirmed active cases is at 244, with 37 people in hospital

Nanaimo senior clocked going 50 km/hr over limit says her SUV shouldn’t be impounded

RCMP say they can’t exercise discretion when it comes to excessive speeding tickets

United Way allocating $6.6M in federal funding to help with food security, youth mental health

Applications from Fraser Valley and Lower Mainland charities being accepted for the emergency funding

Illicit-drug deaths up in B.C. and remain highest in Canada: chief coroner

More than 4,700 people have died of overdoses since B.C. declared a public health emergency in early 2016

CMHC sees declines in home prices, sales, starts that will linger to end of 2022

CMHC said average housing prices could fall anywhere from nine to 18 per cent in its forecast

Most Read

l -->