Aftermath of a federal election

Editor:

With the switch to a Conservative majority – for which the West has been waiting – will it put B.C. on the map of equality with an increase of seating in the House of Commons?

Editor:

With the switch to a Conservative majority – for which the West has been waiting – will it put B.C. on the map of equality with an increase of seating in the House of Commons?

The Conservatives made some noises to that effect recently, but with the continued silence of the democratically elected, who will stand up and renew the expectation?

The leader of the Orange party, speaking in the French language, indicated he will carry on the Bloc policy wanting Quebec perpetually to have 25 per cent of the number of seats in the House, which would be a far cry from equality.

The seat change would not require to open the Constitution. An increase like that also would help B.C. to expect the right to manage its own affairs, lowering the forever-rising bureaucracy in the national capital. Besides, that would give the province the power what money will flow to there, closing the door on patronage.

My view, as printed in the March 6, 1996 Peace Arch News, for greater provincial independence, has not changed.

If only the new premier would drop her Liberalism, becoming a true voice for the province.

Suan.H. Booiman, White Rock

• • •

Re: Interpreting the numbers,

May 6 letters.

Regarding both Pat Petrala and R.M. Strang’s comments about percentages and breakdown of the federal election, I would like to reply.

Petrala, from my understanding, has been affiliated with the Liberals for years. I do not know the other person’s political leanings, but reading between the lines I assume he obviously is, shall we say, left of centre and leave it at that.

I notice a distinctive new way on the part of those individuals is to claim that Stephen Harper and his party should ignore the will of the people who voted for him and only listen to all the others who did not vote for his party because they represent the majority – a majority that did not find the time to vote or that put forward policies that were rejected by the electorate and would have bankrupted the country.

The Liberal party lost because it had no real vision for Canada. I suggest they spend their energy revamping the party. Get rid of the deadwood that seem to feel the taxpayers of Canada owe them. We owe them nothing!

Russ Heibert is the elected MP in South Surrey-White Rock-Cloverdale. Hopefully he will – like any good politician – represent all his constituents, not just individuals who have this attitude that only they and their party affiliations know what’s best for the country.

 

Isobel Stewart, White Rock