Centres grow from history

Editor: Whenever one reads Peace Arch News, it appears the main matters White Rock council deals with is parking, dogs and OCP.

Editor:

Whenever one reads Peace Arch News, it appears the main matters White Rock council deals with is parking, dogs and OCP.

With the low amount of viable income – residential property taxes being the main source – there is little left to talk about.

So the need is, change the OCP again, an annual affair, the sky is the limit.

It is quoted, to be economically safe for a city, the ratio should be 60 per cent residential and 40 per cent commercial (“Billion-dollar year for building in Surrey,” Jan. 10).

With no space in the City of White Rock, it is impossible.

The summer-cabin-1957 city is no more. It is a part of a large population growth for which it is missing the facilities to accommodate in services for the only resort, the beaches.

The vision to have a city centre in between four skyscrapers is a bad joke. City centres develop by appearance and public appeal, which highrises do not provide. Neither does Johnston Road attract.

City centres grow from history. That is why thousands in the Lower Mainland go to Granville and Robson in Vancouver.

White Rock’s history is long gone.

In October, I wrote Ida Chong, minister responsible for municipalities, noting the City of White Rock is on its death bed economically. She wrote back, saying the province will not interfere in the future of White Rock – they leave it up to the city and its neighbours.

The time is now to ask the residents.

Suan H. Booiman, White Rock