Attendees gather at the Cloverdale Cenotaph last Friday to honour war veterans on Remembrance Day.

Attendees gather at the Cloverdale Cenotaph last Friday to honour war veterans on Remembrance Day.

Day of remembrance stirs notions

Editor:

Going through the long list of Remembrance Day media articles from coast to coast, we are encouraged to stand up for history…

Editor:

Going through the long list of Remembrance Day media articles from coast to coast, we are encouraged to stand up for history, recognizing the men and women who gave and risk their lives.

So little we see about the courageous civilians that are among the occupiers.

Working in secrecy, they too did give and risk their lives.

Sadly, most of the time, we don’t know their names.

It was surprising to find in the Saskatoon StarPhoenix an article under the heading, “Let’s remember civilian suffering too.”

Many of the 1945-1965 European immigrants were there, facing starvation, but survived – yet they rarely tell their stories as memory is still hurting.

No history books describe their bravery, for the simple reason they don’t want to be known.

They just did for the good of all there.

Let us remember.

Suan H. Booiman, White Rock

• • •

I attended the Nov. 11 ceremony at the White Rock Cenotaph as I have for many years.

It is always moving and provokes a great deal of thought about how lucky I am to live in Canada.

The singing of our national anthem is a vital part of this ceremony and I enjoy taking part.

What I don’t understand is, why are we singing, “God Save The Queen… long to reign over us?”

Are there Canadians who actually believe that the Queen of England reigns over us?

I, for one, do not.

We are our own country and we reign over ourselves as far as I am concerned.

Roger Currie, Surrey