In praise of our caregivers

Editor:

I have been meaning to write to you for some time now, but it’s hard for me to make the time.

Editor:

I have been meaning to write to you for some time now, but it’s hard for me to make the time.

I have never written to a paper before but felt this was important enough I needed to do it.

I wanted to write about an experience we had with Peach Arch Hospital back in May. My father had been in and out of hospitals over the last couple of years, and we had become very accustomed to the lack of professionalism, care and compassion we had all been treated with in other hospitals.

My parents had just moved here from Richmond to be closer to the family and were concerned about changing doctors, etc. A week after my parents had moved, my father took a turn for the worst and he ended up in Peace Arch Hospital.

On one particular evening, my father was feeling depressed and discouraged and I told him I would come back early the next day, as I was sure he would feel different in the morning. I was sure that since I was coming before what we were used to being “visiting hours” that the staff was going to be upset with me, but I didn’t care.

As I was walking down the hall, the staff greeted me. I was shocked. As I went by the nurses’ station, they asked me if there was anything I needed.

I had become so accustomed to nurses ignoring me and being annoyed by me asking questions that I mentioned it to my family, and they all had the same pleasant experience.

The nurses said they actually encouraged family to come by as often as they wished, as it was good for the patient. And they had him in a private room, not a ward like all the other hospitals.

Was it possible there still was a hospital around that actually had compassion for their patients and for what their family was going through when possibly saying goodbye to a loved one?

Yes there is, and it is Peace Arch Hospital that provided us with a loving warm environment to say goodbye to our father, husband, opa and great-opa on May 19 of this year.

Thanks to both doctors and nurses for putting in the extra effort and not treating my dad like a second-class citizen, like so many of the other hospitals had.

The people of White Rock and Surrey are lucky to have you.

Yvonne Van Gelderen, Surrey

• • •

Recently I have been dealing with a shocking medical condition which has sent me reeling as I have previously had a good constitution.

I have nothing but praise for my doctor and the staff of Peace Arch Hospital in their prompt reaction to my problem.

The tests I needed were expedited within the week, and I felt that things were progressing well – until the test results were suddenly stalled.

My understanding from the doctor was that the transcription at Peace Arch Hospital is now taking up to three weeks for CT scans.

This is not acceptable for people whose results are necessary for referring them to specialists and for whom reaction time is very important.

Our population is aging and will continue to do so.

Peace Arch Hospital and Fraser Health need to plan for the continuous increase in the number of medical tests, as older people are bound to need more attention.

Why not hire a few more transcriptionists to handle the workload? This would surely be a fairly inexpensive way to ease the stress that patients and doctors are already under when faced with possible life-threatening conditions.

E. Spencer, Surrey

• • •

I recently had to be rushed to the emergency ward at Peace Arch Hospital with an illness and ended up spending five days in the acute-care ward for seniors.

I would like to compliment the nurses and support staff, and say thank you for the wonderful treatment I received.

They treated me like I was their own grandpa.

Ralph E. Johnson, Surrey

 

 

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