The death of a juvenile humpback – discovered entwined in fishing line – drew hundreds to White Rock beach.

The death of a juvenile humpback – discovered entwined in fishing line – drew hundreds to White Rock beach.

Lessons from young whale’s death

Re: Crowd gathers as whale succumbs, June 14.

Editor:

Re: Crowd gathers as whale succumbs, June 14.

It was distressing to see the juvenile humpback whale that became entangled, was stranded and eventually perished on the shore in front of the Semiahmoo lands.

Such a shameful sight to see the meters of trawling line that eventually exhausted the beautiful mammal.

The response by those with buckets early in the day to try to save the animal was heartening, and a quick response from Fisheries and Oceans was appreciated.

Along with RCMP and volunteers from the Friends of Semiahmoo Bay Society, they were able to set up a perimeter to keep the public a safe and respectful distance. Those on the beach were, in the main, sombre and came to pay respects.

It is important at this time that we remember the responsibility we all have for the state of our oceans and the health of all of plants and animals that inhabit them.

Focus on what you can do to help by volunteering and learning more about marine restoration initiatives. Visit www.birdsonthebay.ca to learn more about how you can help preserve, protect and rehabilitate our local waters.

Get your children involved by joining our Beach Hero Marine Interpreters walk to learn about the link between life in the intertidal zone and larger marine mammals, June 24 at 2 p.m. at the foot of the White Rock pier.

Yvonne Dawydiak, Friends of Semiahmoo Bay Society

 

Rare opportunity inhibited

How sad that hundreds of people came down to the beach with their children for a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to see a whale up close.

Tragic as its death, it still would have allowed children to see one of these magnificent mammals up close. However, six police cruisers and staff were dedicated to ensure nobody got within 200 yards. The Semiahmoo natives declared the whale as their own and made sure we were all aware of the law of trespass if you tried to cross the taped off line.

Absolutely disgraceful how all these resources were used to stop us and our children from seeing a whale.

We live on the ocean, people!

So it was towed away and this once-in-20-year sight was sunk from sight. There were a lot of very unhappy people on the beach Tuesday evening.

Grant Humaniuk, Surrey

 

Missed chance to help more

I am a Semiahmoo Secondary student and I took part in the recent demonstration in front of MP Russ Hiebert’s office on June 13 to protest against Bill C-38.

I stood on that busy intersection along with 60 others and displayed, amongst their various slogans, my own sign reading: “Honk for Democracy.”

Although we did receive some loud endorsements, most drivers just looked at us with a blank – and often confused – expression. I was especially discouraged when I sensed that people were viewing us simply as oppositions seeking to smear the government and questioned for whom we’re really doing this for.

I want to say that, sir, we’re doing this for the people of our splendid democracy. Not only for the 60 per cent of voters who didn’t support Prime Minister Stephen Harper, but also for the 40 per cent who did, considering many of the changes were nowhere to be found on the Conservative’s party platform.

I still remember skipping class last Tuesday – reads ‘dentist appointment’ – to see the baby whale on the beach, who has inflamed much interest amongst my peers and the community.

If Wednesday’s demonstrating was for that whale, the whole street would spring up with horns. But for a bill that could potentially kill hundreds of whales…

Gary Sipeng Xie, Surrey