LETTERS: Closer look at refugees

Editor:

Re: Christian welcome; Refugee crisis draws dialogue; Refusing refugees rooted in more than fear; Critical look at refugee crisis.

Editor:

Re: Christian welcome, Dec. 4 letters.

I read the heartfelt letter by Pat Young and the feelings she expressed about the refugees from Syria.

Canadians are both caring and giving by nature, and helping others less fortunate a strong suit.

Make no mistake, Canada must remain vigilant, more now than ever before. The Syrian refugees are unique, and the risks and challenges they pose need to be carefully examined. I hope that our newly elected government is not rushing head-long into a situation that compromises our security.

Ron Eves, White Rock

• • •

Re: Refugee crisis draws dialogue, Nov. 27 letters.

In Canada, “love your neighbour as yourself” is basic to our Christian heritage and Canada is very willing to help people in need.

Canada has been settled by people from all over the world and former prime minister Pierre Trudeau instituted that Canada should be a “multicultural society”. He was disappointed it didn’t turn out the way he intended because many new immigrants live together in enclaves instead of mixing.

His son, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, had a huge heart when he pledged to allow 25,000 Syrian refugees by the end of this year.

The troubling difference between the huge number of Syrian people and others who came by the thousands is religion.

No other large groups of people had a religion that set people of other faiths apart in such a negative way as Islam does. Yes, we have Muslim people here already, but in small numbers they tend to blend in with the rest of society. As their numbers grow, they press for special considerations, such as Shariah law.

The wearing of a niqab is a prime example of how one Muslim woman forced the federal government to give special consideration to women who wear a niqab.

I truly hope the Syrian people will be thankful to Canada for rescuing them and hold Canadians in high regard and find peace and comfort in our great country.

L. Wright, Surrey

• • •

Re: Refusing refugees rooted in more than fear, Nov. 20 column; Critical look at refugee crisis, Nov. 20 letters.

I am writing to commend editor Lance Peverley and letter-writer Raaj Chatterjee, on their thoughtful comments regarding refugees coming to Canada. Both of you show that some Canadians are still welcoming and caring people.

Not so much letter-writers David Bradshaw and David Danylyshyn, who are both critical of Canada’s decision to allow 25,000 people from a war zone come to Canada.

Shame on their letters’ pettiness and meanness. Both responses are just as the ISIS wants – to divide us.

Canada’s immigration system is one of the best in the world. I know because I have worked with refugees for more than 25 years.

Do you really think a terrorist would want to be thoroughly screened? Bombings in Europe have been carried out by young European men, not refugees.

Canada is built on immigration. Since the Second World War, Canada has accepted thousands of refugees from Germany, Holland, Hungary, Vietnam, Cambodia, Thailand, Myanmar, Somalia and many other places.

Are any of them terrorists, Mr. Bradshaw? Have not these refugees made Canada better, Mr. Danylyshyn?

I would say Canada has benefited immensely from immigrants and refugees. I would like to see even more refugees coming to this great country.

It is very troubling that some Canadians wish to spread suspicion and fear.

Susan Ellis, White Rock

 

 

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