LETTERS: Crows warrant a major recount

Editor:

Re: Doing nothing puts birds at risk, May 29 letters.

Editor:

Re: Doing nothing puts birds at risk, May 29 letters.

Many thanks to letter-writer Dianne Weremy for bringing forward her concern about too many crows.

When I moved here in 2000, the four large trees near my apartment were filled with birds of every kind and description. Then, about five years ago, the crows moved in.

They killed the baby birds and chased parents away. Now, where we used to hear birdsong, there is only the abrasive sounds of crows.

On a several occasions, the crows have held conventions in the skies, and their numbers are staggering. The swooping and swirling black clouds of crows resemble something out of Alfred Hitchcock’s The Birds.

It is long past time that their numbers were drastically reduced.

Pat Tietzen, White Rock

• • •

I couldn’t agree more with letter-writer Dianne Weremy.

Look around you, folks, as the big black crows are everywhere, and mostly in the residential areas, because, as I have seen, people feed them on our sidewalks and even from their balconies.

Why anyone would want to encourage these ‘pitbull of birds’ to hang around is beyond me. They are loud, aggressive, and territorial. I have seen them attack squirrels, racoons, other birds and bunnies that frequent our neighbourhood. Most have now dissipated as the crows continue to rule the roost.

I have also tried my own humane efforts to eliminate them, but as long as people feed them, they will not leave their food source.

There are no city bylaws against feeding the wildlife, so we have incorporated our own strata bylaw not to do so, and I suggest other stratas do the same to at least eliminate some of this nasty problem.

Cheryl Berti, White Rock

 

 

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