LETTERS: Densification not the answer

Editor:

Re: Discontent grows over highrise proposal, Aug. 14.

Editor:

Re: Discontent grows over highrise proposal, Aug. 14.

Many people are asking how can my voice be heard regarding the development of highrises.

There is a petition against highrise development going around White Rock with over 1,500 signatures. Add your signature to the list.

Write to the editor of the Peace Arch News. Attend any meetings regarding highrise proposals.

Write, phone or email the mayor and all council members regarding your disapproval of any bylaw changes to accommodate highrises.

Attend council meetings whenever possible. Inform them how you would vote should there be an election if the highrises are approved.

The proposal of a 15-storey highrise at the corner of North Bluff and Nichol will affect people immensely should it be approved.

It is not in the downtown area of White Rock. The density, noise level and privacy of homes for blocks around will be affected.

I have lived in my current home for 40 years. I appreciate the quiet single-family-home environment and do not want it to be destroyed by a handful of people on council.

Be proactive and let your voice be heard while there is still time.

Janis Lowe, White Rock

• • •

If White Rock amends its Official Community Plan to accommodate the highrise proposal for North Bluff Road and Nichol Road, will that then open the door to unlimited highrises and other large multidevelopment projects outside the White Rock town centre?

I’m concerned about the drain on our aquifer.

We may think that an aquifer provides access to an unlimited supply of water in perpetuity, but an August 2013 Newsmax article states otherwise. A synopsis of this article: after a four-year study, researchers concluded that at the present rate, the Ogallala Aquifer, most important to Kansas agriculture, will be drained by 70 per cent in 48 years from now, in 2063.

We may think that if White Rock drains its aquifer, that we could always join the Vancouver water supply. But Vancouver is already at stage 3. It is predicted that there won’t be much snowpack this winter, so likely next year will be the same.

Let’s slow down and seriously think about the consequences of unlimited development and its implications for water shortages in White Rock. We are not immune to climate change here in White Rock.

R.L. Kirkpatrick, White Rock