LETTERS: Election night afterthoughts

Editor:

Re: ‘I never have a Plan B’, Watts says, Oct. 21.

Editor:

Re: ‘I never have a Plan B’, Watts says, Oct. 21.

I am encouraged that Dianne Watts has so publicly stated that she will “represent this riding and I will take the issues of the people of this riding forward to Ottawa.”

She has also offered to be a “strong voice for you,” which gives me optimism after our experience of the past years where the party position in Ottawa was clearly represented to the people, rather than the other way round.

I want to congratulate her on winning an extremely close contest for the right to represent all of us.

Undoubtedly, one subject that will be voted on in this new Parliament is the legalization of cannabis. While I do not think this should be the first order-of-business in Ottawa, it is a subject that people in B.C. have spoken clearly on over the years, and in the past month a poll indicated that over two-thirds of the population endorse legalization.

The current prohibition is clearly not working and supports the criminal element and the associated gang violence that make our community safety a genuine concern.

While accepting that it is never easy to admit error, can I now encourage Watts to step down from the ledge of her previous ‘tough-on-crime’ stance and look both at the facts of criminal funding through cannabis and the clear preference of her constituents?

David Hutchinson, Surrey

• • •

A very interesting quote from Judy Higginbotham in the Oct. 21 issue:

“We’re a fairly wealthy riding and a lot of the one per cent were worried they were going to lose money (if the Liberals were elected),” she said. “But I’ve got news for you – you’re going to lose it anyway because Trudeau won.”

First of all, this vindictive and unprofessional response maybe says a lot about the losing candidate.

Also, the Liberals said the tax rate for those making over $200,000 a year would raise from 43 per cent to over 59 per cent, and according to Statistics Canada, the number of Canadians making over $200,000 is actually 546,010 – or 2.08 per cent of the population, not one per cent.

I hope the Liberals are better at putting together next year’s budget!

Wayne G. Mercer, Surrey

• • •

A word to the wise for all the people who stood in line for hours to vote in the advance polls.

At the advance polls, there are two to four stations. None of them have a list of voters, which means the poll clerk has to write every voter’s name and address into a poll book.

Needless to say, that takes time.

On election day, every polling place has four or more stations. Every station has a book with names and addresses, and all the clerk has to do is to put a line through the column once the voter has been identified.

I worked four days at the provincial advance poll and my station had over 2,000 voters alone. On election day, from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. at Semiahmoo Secondary, we processed 85 people – about seven an hour. Needless to say, we had no lineups. We were very lonely and missed all of you advance voters very much.

As originally intended, advance voting was for people who would be away or unable to vote on the day voting was scheduled. As it has turned out, people think that advance voting is advantageous and would result in no waiting times.

Next time, you all might want to rethink your method and stick to the date appointed. Trust me, the lineups will be much shorter.

Edie Williams, Surrey

 

 

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