Combatting Sunday’s fire at Five Corners resulted in a water shortage and boil-water advisory in White Rock.

Combatting Sunday’s fire at Five Corners resulted in a water shortage and boil-water advisory in White Rock.

LETTERS: Fire and lack of water don’t mix

Editor:

Well, if Sunday’s fire proves one thing, it’s that White Rock’s water system is woefully inadequate to sustain a large fire.

Editor:

Well, if Sunday’s fire proves one thing, it’s that White Rock’s water system is woefully inadequate to sustain a large fire as the one that just happened.

It also leads me to believe that the city’s residents need to address this serious issue on a level they never imagined.

If one fire can drain the aquifer to the point of a boil-water advisory, then the city needs to examine linking up to the GVRD water supply and soon – as in real soon.

Can you imagine the damage that could have been done if the fire department had an even bigger fire to fight and what would have happened if the city had actually run out of water?

The mayor and city council had better get their heads around this before we have a major disaster.

I realize this will cost several million dollars to do, but what choice do residents have? Perhaps the city can apply to the feds for a share of the tax dollars that they are handing out for infrastructure projects that are being talked about.

I really don’t know, but the current water system that White Rock is using seems to be woefully inadequate for the job.

Simply put, we have more and more people moving into the area and adding even more demand on what appears to be a very limited water supply.

If it means city taxes have to go up to pay for it, then my vote would be to raise the monies. When you get right down to it, it would be tax dollars well spent.

Mark Tyson, Surrey