LETTERS: Maximizing efficiency

Editor:

Re: Time to revisit city merger, July 10 letters.

Editor:

Re: Time to revisit city merger, July 10 letters.

The letter to the editor from Ron Kistritz has struck a chord with me since digesting his very well-written observations.

I moved from Surrey to White Rock three years ago because downsizing became a necessity.

Now I live in a smaller home on a lot that is a fraction of the size of my former residence, yet my taxes are well over twice as high as in Surrey.

In comparing the two city services, to say that White Rock has been disappointing is putting it mildly. Also, the street I live on looks more like a broken down back alley, which always surprises my visitors to see this is what White Rock looks like.

I realize that, once upon a time, Surrey appeared to be run by a bunch of cowboys, which White Rock chose not to be a part of.

However, over the years Surrey has grown and developed into a sophisticated and efficient operation while White Rock has stood still and actually fallen behind the times.

Of course, it is not possible for a tiny city like White Rock to be as efficient as its big neighbour. This equates to trying to compare a corner mom-and-pop store to, perhaps, Costco.

The newspaper carries horror stories of White Rock increasing its density with highrises in order to broaden its tax base. If we were to join Surrey, then White Rock would be able to remain as is with its quaint character intact.

I would like to challenge the mayor and council to pursue this topic, since it would be in the best interests of the residents – although in the long run it could result in them being out of a job.

Lucille Lewis, White Rock

• • •

Further to Ron Kistriz’s letter of July 10, I heartily agree that amalgamation with Surrey is long overdue.

When I lived in Coquitlam, there were three of everything in the Tri-Cities: three councils, city halls, fire departments, libraries, leisure departments and so on. But only two different police forces and one school board. All of this for a combined population of about 200,000, which is about half of Surrey’s present population.

We had and still have three mayors and 20 councillors, with a total wage bill over a million dollars.

Surrey manages quite nicely with one mayor and eight on council.

Then I moved to White Rock – for the geography not the politics. The situation here is not as bad as the Tri-Cities, perhaps, but it still borders on the absurd that 20,000 people need a political establishment all of their own.

Reunification with Surrey is necessary and desirable.

Asher W. Bell, White Rock

 

 

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