White Rock residents challenge the mayor’s interpretation of what Metro’s population projections mean for their city.

LETTERS: No need for mad rush to grow

Editor:

Re: Legally obligated to grow, Aug. 28 letters.

Editor:

Re: Legally obligated to grow, Aug. 28 letters.

Mayor Wayne Baldwin’s letter to the editor is an attempt to justify recent council decisions regarding development.

Baldwin is referring to Greater Vancouver Regional District Bylaw No. 1136 accepted by White Rock council March 7, 2011. It states that the expected population for White Rock in 2041 will be 27,000, an increase of 7,000 people.

However, it further states these projections are to assist in long-range planning and are guidelines only. Certainly not a mandated requirement, as Baldwin has stated.

The bylaw separates ‘general urban’ areas from ‘urban centres’. A ‘general’ area is designated for lower-density development, whereas ‘urban centres’ are designated as medium- and higher-density areas. In White Rock, the ‘urban centre’ is the area surrounded by North Bluff, George Street, Martin Drive and Thrift Avenue.

The intent and spirit of the bylaw is not to create a must-follow attitude, but more it supports “harmony with nature, fosters community well-being and ensures economic prosperity”.

The tough choice for mayor and some council members is will they embrace the intent and spirit of the bylaw, or will they continue to embrace developers.

Ian Routledge, White Rock

• • •

Re: No legal mandate to add 7,000: Metro, Sept. 2.

Regarding the Metro Regional Growth Strategy for White Rock and the dwelling-units figure of 4,000 that is being bandied about as a goal for 2041 – the correct figure should be 2,700, as White Rock Regional Context Statement figures begin at the year 2006 at 9,400 growing to 13,000 units by 2041, so that is 3,600, not 4,000. I estimate the updated figure for 2015 is approximately 10,350. So, if we follow these numbers, we have 2,650 more units to go and 26 years in which to do it.

As these figures are only guidelines, it is up to us whether we want to build this many more units.

It is worth noting that White Rock is already one of the most compact communities in the region, with less than one per cent of Metro Vancouver’s land area. It is 4.7 times the density than the average for Metro Vancouver.

We are increasing our dwelling-unit numbers slowly all the time when older homes are replaced by larger ones – usually including a suite – and when older homes are replaced by low-density units within the proper zoning.

This mad rush by developers to push highrises through on land that is not zoned for highrises should not happen. The White Rock Coalition did not campaign on massive development at election time, but it appears that if we don’t speak up loudly, they will adjust the Official Community Plan to allow this to happen.

Patricia Kealy, White Rock

• • •

Perhaps lost in the controversy about population growth in White Rock, is that only two of the four Bosa Towers in the town centre have been built.

I assume the other two have not been built because the real estate market would not bear their price.

What makes the mayor and the developers believe that the proposed towers would have a different fate?

Bob Holden, White Rock

• • •

An open letter to White Rock Coun. Lynne Sinclair.

Your quote from the article in the PAN on the Regional Growth Plan says you are “not the right person to answer” whether it was legally binding.

Why are you not the right person to answer? Are you not a member of council of which the public puts their trust in? Have you not done your homework? Do you not read the PAN? Do you not read your emails? Do you not listen to your constituents?

I am a new resident to White Rock – as Mayor Wayne Baldwin pointed out to me in a recent email exchange – but even I know the answer to that question, which is a resounding no.

I would expect that our members of council would be better informed on such important matters.

Vickie Darts, White Rock

 

 

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