Both the number of election signs – and the vandalism of them – have inspired letter writers to comment.

LETTERS: Signs of these political times

Both the number of election signs – and the vandalism of them – have inspired letter writers to comment.

Editor:

It has come to my attention, many times over the past few weeks, that political signage along the 24 Avenue corridor has been vandalized and defaced.

I find these to be targeted attacks, and completely disgusting and juvenile. I am appalled at the behaviour of these individuals and hope the general public keeps their eyes open and reports witnessed vandalism to the police.

I guess ignorant people don’t get that the wood shards and nails left from their destruction could harm my dog as I walk her through those areas. All I can say is “idiots”.

Keri Earnshaw, Surrey

• • •

For almost two months now, I have watched the signs for the Conservative candidate being systematically and thoroughly vandalized. What exactly is that going to accomplish, apart from being very frustrating to the volunteers in charge of signs? Seeing as not a single sign for the Liberal or the NDP candidate has been maltreated only shows me that the conservative-leaning part of the population has a lot more class and understanding of the political process than the opposition.

A word to the nitwits doing the damage – flattening the signs does not change anyone’s mind.

Terry Williams, Surrey

• • •

While walking down 16 Avenue last month, I was furious to see workers erecting a Conservative sign, but destroying the signs of another party in the process.

I gestured to them, but they ignored me.

Is this a good example of politics or fair play, for anyone, especially young impressionable voters?

C.R.E Harding, White Rock

• • •

I have been watching since the election writ was dropped some very dirty politics. Taking the high road in life is always the route to take.

The damage to election signage needs to be condemned, but is rife in the riding of South Surrey-White Rock. It seems obvious when one candidates signs are damaged and other candidates signs are untouched.

The Criminal Code addresses this offence differently than simple public mischief, and with a different penalty.

This is no way to win an election.

Ron Eves, White Rock

• • •

A Conservative supporter came to our office, noting that a number of Dianne Watts signs had been knocked down and that NDP and Liberal signs were still in place, and suggested that there might be a connection.

In fact, as I explained, a number of our signs have also been damaged. However, we have a crew that goes out at 6 a.m. every morning to replace signs, so the appearance of having our signs untouched does not reflect reality.

On behalf of the Pixie Hobby campaign, I want to state our condemnation of any sign destruction regardless of the party concerned.

Peter Ferris, Surrey

• • •

I am disappointed we have to tolerate the barrage of candidate signs in South Surrey along the roadways and on the medians, one after the other, all for one particular candidate. Fortunately the other two candidates have the common sense and class to know that more is not always better.

This very thing happened the last civic election. Yes, they won, but how’s that working for us? I don’t see much change in crime and I still don’t see more “boots on the ground” or the other election promises.

Think about it before you vote, folks. All is not gold that glitters and plasters signage without end.

F.G.M. Smith, Surrey

• • •

As an undecided voter, I made a decision that will help me out of my dilemma.

On my way to work, I have decided to vote based on the greatest number of signs along the roadside.

After making this decision, it was obvious to me who is the clear winner. I will be voting RE/MAX.

Keith Bates, Surrey

 

 

 

 

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