Surrey Police Service Chief Const. Norm Lipinski, left, speaks during a joint press conference with Surrey RCMP Assistant Commissioner Brian Edwards on Tuesday, Nov. 30, 2021. (File photo: Lauren Collins)

Surrey Police Service Chief Const. Norm Lipinski, left, speaks during a joint press conference with Surrey RCMP Assistant Commissioner Brian Edwards on Tuesday, Nov. 30, 2021. (File photo: Lauren Collins)

LETTERS: Two police forces leading to budget shortfall no way to run a city

Editor:

RE: Surrey looking at $10.7M budget shortfall because of policing expenditures, July 28

Reading your article on Surrey’s forecasted $10.7 million budget shortfall due to “higher than budgeted” expenditures on policing one can only shake one’s head and wonder what the city has had to sacrifice to policing costs.

This is especially so given the recently reported $194.8 million budget for police services this year, plus $63.7 million for transition expenses (moving from RCMP to Surrey Police).

Residents can certainly imagine how $10.7 million might contribute to needed social services in the city. Perhaps resources for our unhoused neighbours. Cooling centres and water stations would certainly be helpful during this heatwave. Some residents have taken to social media to note that with the closure of the North Surrey Rec Centre there is not even an indoor pool in the city centre.

It is past time to think about how ever-escalating policing costs are negatively impacting social services and community resources that could improve safety and well-being from the ground up.

Two police forces leading to budget shortfalls is no way to run a city.

Dr. Jeff Shantz, Department of Criminology, KPU Surrey

City of SurreyLetter to the EditorPolice