LETTERS: Visitors leave bits behind

Letter writers suggest there are better ways to dispose of their waste.

Editor:

I am a resident of Crescent Beach.

This wonderful little seaside community brings joy and relaxation to thousands of people every month.

Families come here to play on the beaches with their kids, do nature walks, watch the eagles, blue herons and other wildlife. They buy ice cream, munch on a serving of good-old-fashioned greasy fish ’n chips, or take in a lunch and a glass of wine at one of the local restaurants.

A beautiful natural environment such as this enriches the lives of many people and is intended to be shared with everybody that appreciates it.

Most people enjoy it the way they are supposed to enjoy it, by packing out what they bring in or by disposing of their garbage in one of the many garbage bins placed in and around the community.

But not everybody does.

I cannot speak for other residents of Crescent Beach, but I am noticing an increase in careless behaviour – I prefer to use the word ‘uncaring’ – not just on the beach but also in green spaces and on just about every residential street and back alley.

Beer cans, bottles, food wrappers, condiments, cigarette butts, condoms, food scraps, you name it… If you can think of it, it is being tossed out.

What makes people think it is OK to do this? Is there a way that we can correct this type of behaviour?

I do not understand the total disrespect for others. It makes me sad and I wish I could fix it.

I am afraid though that this behaviour is indicative of a far more serious underlying social problem.

Monique van Leeuwen, Surrey

• • •

Re: Shedding light on fire hazard, May 18 letters.

In regards to the letter to the editor by Gerda Barwieck, I fully agree that many smokers are careless about discarding their burning cigarette butts, obviously a fire hazard in dry conditions.

I would even go further to suggest they are more than careless, having no respect for the environment or the health of their fellow citizens when they toss out that butt, alive or dead.

Many groups in the South Surrey/White Rock area participate in beach and street cleanups throughout the year and the most common item picked up – labouriously – are cigarette butts.

Why are people bothering to pick up these filthy little butts by the thousands? Because used cigarette butts are not just pieces of paper and non-biodegradable plastic.

They also contain the carcinogens, nicotine and toxins found in all tobacco products. These toxins enter the rivers, lakes and ocean and are eventually ingested by fish, animals and even children playing.

Smokers, take heed.

Butt out in an ashtray of some kind and dispose in a safe manner.

Or better yet, drop the habit.

Sharon Jones, White Rock

 

 

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