About 150 attended an open house hosted by the City of Surrey last year to discuss one area of Grandview Heights.

LETTERS: We need to guide city’s growth

Editor:

I am concerned that proposed developments are extending the urban boundaries in Grandview Heights unnecessarily.

Editor:

I am concerned that proposed developments in the area of 28 Avenue/164 Street are extending the urban boundaries in Grandview Heights unnecessarily.

My concerns include:

1. Are official community plans (OCPs) that easily sidestepped? If so, what is their purpose? I can only think that they are there to placate the public and blind them to the real plans the city might have. Such plans may well be against the wishes of the public.

2. Do the mayor and council see an urgent need for even more high-density urbanization than is already planned in Grandview Heights? I thought the idea behind planning high-density urbanization near highways was to protect the environment around those areas, allowing trees and green space to thrive near the high-density areas.

3. It appears to me that infrastructure is not keeping pace with development within approved neighbourhood concept plans (NCPs).

a. The newly built Sunnyside Elementary is already at capacity, and the majority of people moving into these new urban developments are people with young families. What happens with their children?

b. Hospitals are notoriously crowded and underfunded. After researching health care in South Surrey, my family and I decided it was actually faster and safer for us to travel to Vancouver for health care. It seems strange to me to promise people resources by building residences for them and making them pay taxes, but then to not provide those resources.

c. Perhaps I am misinformed, but crime seemed to be a big issue in the last election. High-density urban areas have a lot more crime than rural areas. Perhaps the police force and city ordinances should be altered enough to be able to deal with the problems we already see, before sacrificing beautiful suburban/rural lots, with trees and low impact on the city’s infrastructure, to increase density still further.

d. I recently ran a quick analysis of how much untreated water is entering Surrey’s streams because of increased roads and no road runoff mediation. In a mere 500-metre square block, one million litres of road runoff will enter nearby streams and rivers in a single day.

Unrestrained urbanization, without due consideration of the environment, usually leads to lower quality of life and higher costs for the government in the long run.

In short, let’s use the opportunity to urbanize greenfield areas to make a model city, not one where people will regret investing their money in property.

Alisa P. Ramakrishnan, Surrey

• • •

On Sept. 8, I attended a public hearing at Surrey City Hall for a proposed subdivision from an area where there was no Neighbourhood Concept Plan in place.

The corporate report prepared as part of the process specifically cautioned council that Surrey’s Official Community Plan requires an NCP before approval in order to avoid potential problems with infrastructure, engineering, transitions between land uses and a host of other issues, not the least of which is lack of public consultation.

It further stated that: “The NCP process was developed as a result of the problems that the city experienced in relation to allowing development to occur in the absence of a proper holistic plan.”

When a concerned taxpayer asked why this development could possibly proceed when the NCP for West Clayton – which hadn’t reached Stage 2 completion – isn’t in place yet, Mayor Dianne Watts interjected that all applications have to wait, and that the policy has been in place since the NCP process began in the 1980s: “There’s no application that will come before council in Stage 1 that will get approved. It will not happen; it cannot happen; it has never happened.”

Perhaps Watts had forgotten the fact that she and her Surrey First council approved a 36-lot subdivision in our peaceful suburban Grandview Heights neighbourhood last June 23, despite the fact that there is no NCP in place for our area.

This decision was overwhelmingly opposed by area homeowners.

We haven’t forgotten.

Gary Cameron, Surrey

 

 

Just Posted

Road safety plan in the works for Surrey

Council to consider hosting ‘Vision Zero’ summit in new year

VIDEO: Hundreds of volunteers collect, wrap toys in Surrey at Sikh elementary school

Guru Nanak Free Kitchen, Sikh Academy partner together on annual toy drive

City of Surrey looks to reduce building permit wait times

Staff targeting a 10-week average processing time

Surrey considers 75% discount on senior rec passes, drop-in admission

Council to vote Monday on proposal to deeply discount rates for residents over 70

‘A promise is a promise’: Cloverdale lantern festival opens, two months late

After months of delays due to permit issues and uncooperative weather, Art of Lights finally opens

Trudeau to make it harder for future PM to reverse Senate reforms

Of the 105 current senators, 54 are now independents who have banded together in Independent Senators’ Group

Man dies after falling from B.C. bridge

Intoxicated man climbed railing, lost his balance and fell into the water below

Hundreds attend Hells Angels funeral in Maple Ridge

Body of Chad John Wilson found last month face-down under the Golden Ears Bridge.

B.C. animation team the ‘heart’ of new ‘Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse’

The animators, largely based in Vancouver, ultimately came up with a creative technique that is drawing praise

Light at the end of the tunnel for UN climate talks

Meeting in Katowice was meant to finalize how countries report their emissions of greenhouses gases

Gas prices to climb 11 cents overnight in Lower Mainland

Hike of 17 cents in less than 48 hours due to unexpected shutdown of Washington state pipeline

Janet Jackson, Def Leppard, Nicks join Rock Hall of Fame

Radiohead, the Cure, Roxy Music and the Zombies will also be ushered in at the 34th induction ceremony

Supreme Court affirms privacy rights for Canadians who share a computer

Section 8 of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms protects Canadians against unreasonable search and seizure

B.C. fire chief pleads with Ottawa for traumatic stress support

Campbell River fire chief Thomas Doherty presented concerns to federal government

Most Read

l -->