A capacity crowd at the City of White Rock’s advisory design panel in July indicates residents’ growing interest.

A capacity crowd at the City of White Rock’s advisory design panel in July indicates residents’ growing interest.

LETTERS: White Rock suffers growing pains

Editor:

Re: Legally obligated to grow, Aug. 28 letters; No legal mandate to add 7,000: Metro, Sept. 2.

Editor:

Re: Legally obligated to grow, Aug. 28 letters; No legal mandate to add 7,000: Metro, Sept. 2.

After reading the mayor of White Rock write about his perception that the municipality is ‘obligated to grow’, I wonder how he would plan to do so?

It’s easy to build lots of houses, condos and apartment buildings. However, what many municipalities and their leaders haven’t completed is a capacity plan. Do the municipal and provincial leaders, many who are pro development, know how many people the lands will hold?

Aside from food and water, many of our schools, health care, policing/justice and other critical infrastructure are unable to cope with the existing population. This likely will become more complicated when we factor in climate change, such as this past summer’s drought, recent wind storms and flooding. Our present support systems may not cut it.

Has any study been undertaken to determine where municipalities should cap population in order to provide a decent quality of life to the current citizens?

In the event of transportation breakdown, would we be able to feed the current population from local farms for an extended period?

To my knowledge, there has never been a capacity plan developed that addresses the number of people the lands can adequately hold and answers to these specific questions.

So, Mayor Wayne Baldwin can whine on about promoting growth, but to what end? He and the other mayors, along with Premier Christy Clark, don’t have these answers nor have they likely contemplated them.

So, I recommend doing a capacity plan now before it’s too late. Then we can plan for our future with better understanding of what that might look like and whether we need to sacrifice something to achieve those ‘growth’ goals.

John Mackintosh, Surrey

• • •

I don’t think our elected city mayor and councillors have an easy job, but for whatever their personal reasons were at the time, they chose to run for the position.

By accepting the position, they are implicitly agreeing to represent the citizens of White Rock.

With regards to Mayor Wayne Baldwin’s assertion that White Rock is legally obligated to create space for 7,000 new residents, he is either woefully ignorant of reality or he was deliberately trying to mislead the citizens of White Rock. Whichever the case, he has demonstrated that he’s unfit to act as mayor. Certainly, he doesn’t seem to be listening to the wishes of the residents of White Rock or have their best interests at heart.

Perhaps he and any councillors who’ve lost perspective should consider resigning from their positions.

Bruce McIntosh, White Rock

• • •

Just a note of appreciation to Peace Arch News for drawing public attention to the White Rock highrise fiasco and the mayor’s very questionable Regional Growth Strategy interpretation.

No credibility, no mandate.

Keith Deevy, White Rock

• • •

Hey! Relax, everyone! If the Regional Growth Strategy carries as much weight as the Official Community Plan, we have nothing to worry about – (winky face).

Michèle McManus, White Rock

• • •

An open letter to Mayor Wayne Baldwin and council.

I admire the leadership expressed by Langley Township in fighting Metro and would expect you to do the same.

For you to say you would not be willing to go to the court “over a couple thousand people” really implies you do not care to represent our city for important issues.

You accuse Coun. Helen Fathers for being political. It is you who is being stubborn, patronizing and do not like getting corrected.

Coun. Lynne Sinclair, I understand we have to respect the guidelines we agreed to. However, please note I used the word “guidelines” and not “law” as the mayor claims.

Mayor Baldwin, if the city lawyer has advised you to write letters-to the-editor page under extreme circumstances or to correct information, what extreme circumstances prompted you to write the letter about the legal mandate? I suggest you write another letter to correct the information and apologize to the residents for misleading us.

Aroon Shah, White Rock

 

 

Just Posted

Councillor Doug Elford. (File photo: Amy Reid)
Elford to join Surrey Homelessness and Housing Society as a director

Fellow Safe Surrey Coalition Councillors Laurie Guerra, Mandeep Nagra and Allison Patton will be re-appointed to the board

A cyclist stops traffic to allow a gaggle of geese cross the road. (Tino Fluckiger photo)
White Rock man asks motorists to be mindful of wildlife after close call

Impatient motorists drives into oncoming traffic

Big Splash water park is located in Tsawwassen. (submitted photo)
Big Splash reopens Canada Day with changes to keep the water park ‘safe for everyone’

Executive Hotels & Resorts has owned and operated the attraction since 2017

Elgin Park Secondary students rally for climate change outside of their South Surrey in 2019. (Nick Greenizan photo)
City of Surrey set to host online climate-action panel

June 23 Zoom event to include speakers, question-and-answer period

(Photo: Tom Zytaruk)
Surrey council moves to reduce parking along rapid transit corridors

This also targets rental housing developments in Rapid Transit Areas

Maxwell Johnson is seen in Bella Bella, B.C., in an undated photo. The Indigenous man from British Columbia has filed complaints with the B.C. Human Rights Tribunal and the Canadian Human Rights Commission after he and his granddaughter were handcuffed when they tried to open a bank account. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Heiltsuk Nation, Damien Gillis, *MANDATORY CREDIT*
VIDEO: Chiefs join human rights case of Indigenous man handcuffed by police in B.C. bank

Maxwell Johnson said he wants change, not just words, from Vancouver police

A woman wears a vaccinated sticker after receiving a COVID-19 vaccine at a vaccination clinic run by Vancouver Coastal Health, in Richmond, B.C., Saturday, April 10, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
B.C. ranks among highest in world in COVID-19 first-dose shots: health officials

More than 76% of eligible people have received their 1st shot

A screenshot of the First Peoples Cultural Councils First Peoples’ Map. (First Peoples Cultural Council)
Online resource blends B.C.’s Indigenous language, art and culture

Advisor says initiative supports the urgent need to preserve Indigenous languages

An artists conception of the new terminal building at the Pitt Meadows Regional Airport.
Air travel taking off in B.C., but lack of traffic controllers a sky-high concern

There will be demand for more air traffic controllers: Miller

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

Canadian Armed Forces experts are on their way to North Vancouver after a local homeowner expressed worry about a military artifact he recently purchased. (Twitter DNV Fire and Rescue)
Military called in to deal with antique ‘shell’ at North Vancouver home

‘The person somehow purchased a bombshell innocently believing it was an out-of-commission military artifact’

Amy Kobelt and Tony Cruz have set their wedding date for February, hoping that more COVID-19 restrictions will have lifted. (The Macleans)
B.C. couples ‘gambling’ on whether COVID rules will let them dance at their wedding

Amy Kobelt and Tony Cruz pushed back their wedding in hopes of being able to celebrate it without the constraints of COVID-19

A plane is silhouetted as it takes off from Vancouver International Airport in Richmond, B.C., May 13, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Report calls for airlines to refund passengers for flights halted due to COVID-19

Conclusion: federal help should be on the condition airlines immediately refund Canadian travellers

Green party Leader Annamie Paul speaks during a news conference on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Tuesday, June 15, 2021. Paul has survived another day of party strife after a planned ouster shifted course, leaving her with a tenuous grip on power ahead of a likely federal election this year. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang
Green Leader Annamie Paul blasts ‘racist,’ ‘sexist’ party execs who sought ouster

Fallout has continued, with two of the federal council’s members resigning

Most Read