No incentive to stop thieves

Editor:

Re: They don’t care that it hurts us, Nov. 3 letters.

This letter brought it all back for me.

Editor:

Re: They don’t care that it hurts us, Nov. 3 letters.

This letter brought it all back for me. It happened to me a few months ago, and I was so tempted to write about it but somehow I just let it go, because I realized that it was my own fault – I let my guard down.

But, darn it, why should people have to guard everything they have all the time for fear of being robbed?

We were parked at Crescent Park while we took our grandson for a walk. I am a very conscientious person and make it a point not to leave my purse in my car.

That day, however, I made a bad decision and I decided to hide it in the back underneath a jacket.

As it turns out, I was told later that thieves are actually lurking in the bushes watching for this.

We were on our way back to the car and not too far away, when we heard the smashing glass and the car alarm go off. We were about a minute late; the thieves had grabbed the bag and sped off in an older vehicle that was difficult to identify.

A polite cop came and took the details. But, as he said, “it happens all the time, every day,” and there is not much they can do about it.

I only had about $20 in the purse. I was sorry to lose my cellphone though. I was particularly sad to have lost a special and expensive handbag that had recently been given to me as a gift. That can’t be replaced and, for all I know, it is lying in some bushes somewhere after it was thrown from the car.

The worst of it, though, is the time it takes to phone up all the card companies, including credit, banking, driver’s licence, etc. It is so time consuming, costly and downright annoying.

Personally, I think the law doesn’t really want to do anything about it.

Think: it is a “make-work project” for the auto-glass companies and ICBC; it keeps the credit-card company busy printing up new cards and doing the paperwork, and as insurance companies won’t pay for the losses, people still have to go out and buy new cellphones, computers, etc. so it’s all good for the economy.

D. Barros, White Rock