OUR VIEW: Make Surrey’s policing plan public

Premier John Horgan weighs in on the need for transparency

We’ll say this for Surrey Mayor Doug McCallum – at least the man knows how to keep a secret.

But knowing when not to, however, might not be his forte.

It’s certainly telling indeed when Premier John Horgan himself sees fit to weigh in on the need for this mayor to share with Surrey residents – the people who elected him and to whom he’s answerable – the contents of a report concerning council’s big plans to swap out the Surrey RCMP for a made-in-Surrey police force.

Horgan told reporters on Tuesday he believes transparency to be “the order of the day.”

“When you’re making such an extraordinary change in how activity takes place in Surrey, how law enforcement will be conducted, who will be conducting that, I think the public has every right to know that, absolutely,” Horgan told the Globe and Mail.

READ ALSO: Policing in Surrey – what exactly is the plan?

McCallum, who does not have a track record of bending to pressure, must ultimately win the approval of the provincial government if he’s to make good on his election promise to set up a new police force here. That plan must be sent to higher places for review.

Incidentally, McCallum and his Safe Surrey Coalition had also campaigned on “World-class Public Engagement,” promising to set up within 90-days of its election a mayor’s standing committee to that effect. “The objective will be to develop and implement world-class communications strategies and processes between residents and the city,” the campaign literature reads.

World-class, mind you. In case anyone needs reminding.

McCallum is quoted on safesurreycoalition.ca as saying, “Today residents expect to be more involved in the planning and development of their communities…”

He’s right.

And now a major political figure on the left is reminding him of that.

Now-Leader



edit@surreynowleader.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

Two women recognized for multiculturalism, anti-racism work in Surrey

Awards ceremony held on International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination

Homeless deaths in Surrey quadruple between 2007 and 2016

Deaths in the city spiked in 2015 from the previous year

Surrey’s truck survey closes Sunday

‘Sustainable solutions for authorized commercial truck parking’ sought

WATCH: Langley Glow events denied permission to run

Darvonda Nurseries received a notice from the ALC on March 5.

South Surrey firefighters rescue cat from tree

The cat ‘got himself a little too high for comfort’

VIDEO: Restaurant robots are already in Canada

Robo Sushi in Toronto has waist-high robots that guide patrons to empty seats

Vancouver Giant named to Western Conference first-tier all-star team

Young hockey defenceman Bowen Byram is once again lauded for his outstanding efforts on the ice

Permit rejected to bring two cheetahs to B.C.

Earl Pfeifer owns two cheetahs, one of which escaped in December 2015

Real-life tsunami threat in Port Alberni prompts evacuation updates

UBC study says some people didn’t recognize the emergency signal

Care providers call for B.C. seniors’ watchdog to step down

The association also asks the province to conduct an audit and review of the mandate of her office

Nitro Cold Brew Coffee from B.C. roaster recalled due to botulism scare

“If you purchased N7 Nitro Cold Brew Coffee from Cherry Hill … do not drink it.”

North Delta happenings: week of March 21

Events, courses and clubs listings for North Delta

B.C. man gets award for thwarting theft, sexual assault – all in 10 minutes

Karl Dey helped the VPD take down a violent sex offender

Baby left alone in vehicle in B.C. Walmart parking lot

Williams Lake RCMP issue warning after attending complaint at Walmart Wednesday

Most Read

l -->