OUR VIEW: Make Surrey’s policing plan public

Premier John Horgan weighs in on the need for transparency

We’ll say this for Surrey Mayor Doug McCallum – at least the man knows how to keep a secret.

But knowing when not to, however, might not be his forte.

It’s certainly telling indeed when Premier John Horgan himself sees fit to weigh in on the need for this mayor to share with Surrey residents – the people who elected him and to whom he’s answerable – the contents of a report concerning council’s big plans to swap out the Surrey RCMP for a made-in-Surrey police force.

Horgan told reporters on Tuesday he believes transparency to be “the order of the day.”

“When you’re making such an extraordinary change in how activity takes place in Surrey, how law enforcement will be conducted, who will be conducting that, I think the public has every right to know that, absolutely,” Horgan told the Globe and Mail.

READ ALSO: Policing in Surrey – what exactly is the plan?

McCallum, who does not have a track record of bending to pressure, must ultimately win the approval of the provincial government if he’s to make good on his election promise to set up a new police force here. That plan must be sent to higher places for review.

Incidentally, McCallum and his Safe Surrey Coalition had also campaigned on “World-class Public Engagement,” promising to set up within 90-days of its election a mayor’s standing committee to that effect. “The objective will be to develop and implement world-class communications strategies and processes between residents and the city,” the campaign literature reads.

World-class, mind you. In case anyone needs reminding.

McCallum is quoted on safesurreycoalition.ca as saying, “Today residents expect to be more involved in the planning and development of their communities…”

He’s right.

And now a major political figure on the left is reminding him of that.

Now-Leader



edit@surreynowleader.com

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